Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Soulard in St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Historic Soulard

 
 
Historic Soulard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, October 24, 2020
1. Historic Soulard Marker
Inscription.  

History

The area known as Soulard was once part of the estate of Antoine and Julia Soulard. Antoine came to St. Louis via New Orleans, having left France to literally save his head - he was a loyalist to King Louis XVI. Once in St. Louis he did well for himself by marrying into the wealthy Cerre Family, and as a surveyor he was granted a great deal of property in payment for his services. But a problem developed when they decided to sell part of the estate. They had been granted the property under the old Spanish land grants and had to sue the United States government for clear title. Antoine died and Julia settled the case in 1836 by paying two thousand dollars to secure clear title to the property. With a clear property title in hand she began subdividing the property and selling off lots, thus becoming the first female real estate developer west of the Mississippi River (and maybe in America). The first parcel was sold to Bishop Rosatti and you can seee the church that was built on the property across I-55 - just northwest to the Market. Julia gave two city blocks to the people of St. Louis with the stipulation that
Historic Soulard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, October 24, 2020
2. Historic Soulard Marker
Soulard Farmers Market is in the background.
the land should forever be used as a public market.

Soulard Farmers Market

The first market house, built in 1843, was destroyed by the tornado of 1896. Two sheds served as the market until 1928. The architect, A. Osburg, patterned the south entrance the new market after the Founding Hospital in Florence, one of the first masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance designed by Filipo Brunelleschi. Soulard Market is the most recognizable landmark in the Soulard Historic District. People come from all over St. Louis to take advantage of the Market's low prices on fresh fruit and fresh produce.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureIndustry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWomen. In addition, it is included in the Missouri, St. Louis, Soulard Historic District ⚜️ series list.
 
Location. 38° 36.606′ N, 90° 12.081′ W. Marker is in Soulard in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker is on Lafayette Avenue east of South 8th Street, on the right when traveling east. Marker is near the entrance to Soulard Farmers Market. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 728 Lafayette Ave, Saint Louis MO 63104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Soulard Market (within shouting distance of this marker); Becker House (about 500 feet
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
away, measured in a direct line); Philip W Schneider House (about 700 feet away); St. Elizabeth Settlement & Day Nursery (about 800 feet away); Sts. Peter and Paul Parish (approx. ¼ mile away); The Trapper Cottage (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named The Trapper Cottage (approx. ¼ mile away); The Slezak House (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Soulard.
 
More about this marker. Marker contains a map of the St. Louis neighborhood.
 
Also see . . .
1. Soulard Business Association. Website for the preservation group, which includes information about restaurants, businesses, history as well as the Soulard neighborhood's historic landmarks. (Submitted on October 25, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 

2. Antoine Soulard on Wikipedia. Soulard (1766-1825), whose name is on one of the City of St. Louis' oldest neighborhoods, was born in Rochefort, France. As the marker states, he left his homeland for the United States during the French Revolution. Originally settled in Marblehead, Massachusetts, he learned that most Frenchmen lived in St. Louis. He would spend the rest of his life in St. Louis, raising
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
four children. (Submitted on October 25, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 25, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 55 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 25, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 2, 2021