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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Buffalo Soldiers

 
 
Buffalo Soldiers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 11, 2020
1. Buffalo Soldiers Marker
Inscription.  
About 200,000 African-Americans served in the Civil War. When the army reorganized at the end of the war, it established six regiments in the regular army to be composed of African-American recruits. The 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments and four infantry regiments were authorized in 1866. The four infantry regiments were reorganized into the 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments in 1869. These four regiments were the nucleus around which most African-American soldiers coalesced in the Army until it was integrated by President Truman in 1948.

The earliest and best documented account of the origin of the term "buffalo soldiers" — which would become synonymous with all African-Americans in the army — comes from an 1871 reference quoting Comanche Indians, as a comparison of the soldiers' dark, curly hair. There are also accounts that the name came from the buffalo hide coats the soldiers would be issued for winter campaigning. Still another attributes the name to Cheyanne warriors in 1877. African-American soldiers wore the name with pride.

The Buffalo Soldiers served in the frontier campaigns versus Native American
Buffalo Soldiers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 11, 2020
2. Buffalo Soldiers Marker
tries, protected the Mexican border from "bandits" such as Pancho Villa, fought in the Spanish-American War (including Roosevelt's assault on San Juan Hill), and the Philippine Insurrection. Buffalo Soldiers were also among America's first national park rangers, patrolling America's national parks years prior to the 1916 creation of the National Park Service.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansParks & Recreational AreasWar, Spanish-AmericanWar, US CivilWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Buffalo Soldiers, the Former U.S. Presidents: #26 Theodore Roosevelt, and the Former U.S. Presidents: #33 Harry S. Truman series lists.
 
Location. 39° 38.995′ N, 77° 43.046′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and Jonathan Street, on the right when traveling north on Pennsylvania Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 464 Jonathan St, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. African Americans and the Medal of Honor (here, next to this marker); Corporal William Othello Wilson (here, next to this marker); United States Colored Troops (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line);
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Hagerstonians in the Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away); 468 North Potomac Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); 474 North Potomac Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Hagerstonians in the Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Hagerstonians in the Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 11, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 11, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 41 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 11, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Mar. 7, 2021