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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Rileyville in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

U.S. Route 340

Benefitting the Page Valley

 
 
U.S. Route 340 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 19, 2020
1. U.S. Route 340 Marker
Inscription.  Through the first half of the twentieth century, increasing automobile traffic and the transportation demands of industry and the armed forces during two world wars contributed to highway improvements in western Virginia. In 1934, plans were made to replace the nineteenth-century Front Royal & Luray turnpike Through Page County with a modern roadway designated U.S. Route 340. The new highway, completed in 1936, provided a safer route through the county and ran in a nearly straight line from Overall to Gooney Run. It included large-span bridges, such as the one here at Overall Run.

The Highway and other roads constructed between the wars were essential to the Valley's expanding industries. Abundant supplies of iron ore, limestone, and charcoal had long made the Shenandoah Valley a center of iron production. Tanneries also dotted the landscape in Page County. Residents transported loads of bark to them in huge quantities. During the height of production, more than one hundred tons of bark were delivered daily to the nearby Delford Tannery.

Page County tourism also benefitted from the construction of US Route 340 and the amenities
US 340 & Railroad Bridges near the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 19, 2020
2. US 340 & Railroad Bridges near the marker.
In the center is the former Overall Bridge No. 1990. The history of this bridge is described in greater detail by the nearby "Overall Bridge - Design Innovation" marker.
that followed. The county is a gateway to Skyline Drive and Shenandoah National Park, where visitation soared between the wars. Shenandoah Valley residents recognized the economic opportunities that the improved highway offered, and they accommodated the growing number of visitors. Lodges, cabins, campgrounds, restaurants, motels, and shops were built along the highway to attract business and augment the Civilian Conservation Corps' infrastructure improvements. Page County became known as the "Cabin Capital of Virginia."

(captions)
Road workers, 1921, from Page, The County of Plenty (1976)

CCC workers from Camp Spotswood in Page County planting laurel on Skyline Drive - Courtesy Library of Congress

Wagon hauling bark to a tannery, from Page, The County of Plenty (1976)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceParks & Recreational AreasRoads & Vehicles.
 
Location. 38° 48.338′ N, 78° 20.951′ W. Marker is in Rileyville, Virginia, in Page County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Stonewall Jackson Highway (U.S. 340) and Overall Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rileyville VA 22650, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow
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flies. Battle of Milford (here, next to this marker); The Historic Page Valley (here, next to this marker); Overall Bridge (here, next to this marker); Warren County / Page County (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Valley Church of God in Christ Jesus (approx. 4.7 miles away); Help Wanted! (approx. 4.8 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 4.8 miles away); A Skyline Drive for a Bird's-Eye View (approx. 7.2 miles away).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 16, 2020, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2020, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021