Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Felipe in Austin County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Toward Revolution

 
 
Toward Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 29, 2020
1. Toward Revolution Marker
Inscription.  

The Convention of 1833, followed by the Consultation in 1835, reflected the growing tension between the colonists and the Mexican government. The fateful military and political events of late 1835, would sway Austin to the war movement.

Austin traveled to Mexico in the spring of 1833 to deliver demands for Independent Texas statehood, separate from the state of Coahuila. Discouraged by the response, he wrote to supporters in Bexar (modern San Antonio) encouraging the formation of a state government in defiance of Mexican authorities. As a result, Austin was imprisoned for almost two years. During the fall of 1835 the second of San Felipe's presses launched the Telegraph and Texas Register newspaper. This paper served as the voice of the Texas Revolution printing 22 issues during the campaign - the first reported on the "Come and Take It" incident at Gonzales and the last was being printed at Harrisburg (modern-day Houston) on April 14, 1836 when Santa Anna's army captured the press and burned the town. The press had relocated to Harrisburg after the evacuation and burning of San Felipe to continue providing support
The Toward Revolution Marker is the left marker of the two markers. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, November 29, 2020
2. The Toward Revolution Marker is the left marker of the two markers.
for the interim government.

Captions
Delegates discuss frustrations above the Mexican government

Elected delegates met at San Felipe for the Conventions of 1832 and 1833, and the Consultation of 1835. The town served as the seat of the provisional Texas government in the months leading up to the Declaration of Independence in March of 1836.

The Telegraph and Texas Register was initially managed by the partnership of Baker and Bordens (Joseph Baker, Gail Borden Jr., and his brother John Borden). The firm brought printers from Baltimore to run the press. This illustration shows an early 19th century print shop.

From October 1835 to April 1836, the Baker and Bordens press produced some of the most recognized historic documents from early Texas - the Declaration of the People of Texas (November 1835), Travis' letter from the Alamo (March 1836) and the Unanimous Declaration of Independence (March 1836). The handwritten receipt was submitted to the new government of the Republic of Texas for payment for printing in support of the independence cause.

With Austin imprisoned in Mexico City and Samuel May Williams increasingly in the United States to seek support for the war, Gail Borden assumed command of the land office in addition to his efforts managing the press. Borden would later gain prominence as the founder
Gail Borden - Texas Colonial Leader and Inventor image. Click for full size.
Public Domain
3. Gail Borden - Texas Colonial Leader and Inventor
of the Borden Milk Company.

During the Consultation of 1835, an 8-6 vote determined the relocation of the government to Washington-on-the-Brazos where the Declaration of Independence was signed in March of 1836. Primary reasons for this move were the proximity of Washington to growing colonial populations to the east and the lack of improvements at San Felipe (no public buildings) This building is the replica of Independence Hall at Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site.
 
Erected by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 29° 48.431′ N, 96° 5.914′ W. Marker is in San Felipe, Texas, in Austin County. Marker can be reached from Farm to Market Road 1458 0.1 miles north of Park Road 38. The historical marker is located in the San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site. . Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Felipe TX 77473, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Burning of San Felipe (here, next to this marker); A Town Hall (a few steps from this marker); J.J. Josey General Store (a few steps from this marker); Austin's Colony: First Colony in Mexican Texas (within shouting distance of this marker); Stephen F. Austin, Father of Texas
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
(within shouting distance of this marker); San Felipe de Austin Colonial Well (within shouting distance of this marker); Remembering San Felipe de Austin (within shouting distance of this marker); San Felipe de Austin Town Site (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Felipe.
 
Also see . . .
1. Convention of 1833. The Convention of 1833 (April 1–13, 1833), a political gathering of settlers in Mexican Texas, was a successor to the Convention of 1832, whose requests had not been addressed by the Mexican government. ... Delegates also requested customs exemptions and asked that a ban on immigration into Texas be lifted. Source: Wikipedia (Submitted on December 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Gail Borden. In the middle 1840s he began inventing. He is supposed to have experimented with large-scale refrigeration as a means of preventing yellow fever and with a terraqueous machine, a sort of prairie schooner that would go on land or water. Source:The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

3. Consultation 1835. Three issues dominated Consultation deliberations—the purpose
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
of the war, the power and structure of government, and the virtues of different leaders. Source: The Handbook of Texas (Submitted on December 20, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 28 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 5, 2021