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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Sarita in Kenedy County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Under this Tree General Zachary Taylor

 
 
General Zachary Taylor Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 3, 2021
1. General Zachary Taylor Marker
Inscription.  

Commanding the Expeditionary Army of
the United States sent to Texas in 1845
encamped on March 15, 1846,
while en route with his troops
from Corpus Christi to the Rio Grande
Reverse
The
Texas Highway Department
Proudly Dedicates this Park

In Memory of
John G. Kenedy Sr.
and
John G. Kenedy Jr.

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 2143.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, Mexican-American.
 
Location. 27° 7.997′ N, 97° 47.566′ W. Marker is near Sarita, Texas, in Kenedy County. Marker is on U.S. 77 7 miles south of La Parra Road, on the left when traveling north. The marker is located at the Kennedy County Safety Rest Stop on the east side of the restrooms. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sarita TX 78385, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Town of Sarita (approx. 6.1 miles away); Kenedy County Courthouse Construction (approx.
Reverse side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 3, 2021
2. Reverse side of the marker
6.1 miles away); Kenedy County (approx. 6.2 miles away); Riviera - 1687 (approx. 6.2 miles away); Civil War Raid From Camp Boveda (approx. 11½ miles away); Indian Burial Ground (approx. 11½ miles away).
 
More about this marker. The historical marker is facing toward the restrooms and a dedication plaque is on the reverse side facing the road.
 
Also see . . .  Taylor, Zachary (1784–1850).
His unpretentious manner and appearance led troops there to nickname him "Old Rough and Ready." In 1845 Taylor became commander of the force ordered to Texas after annexation. He established his base camp at Corpus Christi; by the spring of 1846 it housed nearly half of the United States Army. In March, on orders from Washington, Taylor moved his force to the north bank of the Rio Grande and established Fort Brown opposite the Mexican town of Matamoros, a move that Mexico considered an invasion of her territory. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on February 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
General Zachary Taylor Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 3, 2021
3. General Zachary Taylor Marker
The reverse side of the General Zachary Taylor Marker as seen from the rest area road image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, February 3, 2021
4. The reverse side of the General Zachary Taylor Marker as seen from the rest area road
General Zachary Taylor Marker image. Click for full size.
Public Domain, circa 1843
5. General Zachary Taylor Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 17, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 18, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021