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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rapidan in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Cedar Mountain

A Narrow Victory

 
 
Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 17, 2021
1. Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker
Inscription.  
"My command did not want to back out. We had backed out enough." — Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, USA

"Banks is in our front and he is generally willing to fight. And he generally gets whipped." — Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, CSA


Following Gen. Robert E. Lee's violent repulse of the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula early in the summer of 1862, Union Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia began to organize for its own offensive from Washington, D.C. Pope's first objective was the railroad hub at Gordonsville, Virginia, an ideal location for staging a new assault on Richmond. Unwilling to allow such a movement, Lee tasked Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and 24,000 men with the defensive of the city.

Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, in the vanguard of Pope's army, led his corps into Culpeper County on August 6. Jackson moved quickly to attack Banks before the rest of the Union force could organize and concentrate against him. On August 9, after a hard march, Jackson encountered Banks's men in position nearly half a mile up the road in front of you, then known as the Culpeper

Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 17, 2021
2. Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker
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Road.

Banks ordered an attack of his own as Jackson's exhausted column approached his lines. The fury of the Union assault nearly routed the Confederates, but Jackson rode to the front and rallied his men under heavy fire. His stand bough time for Gen. A.P. Hill's division to arrive and deliver a crushing counterattack that won the battle. The Battle of Cedar Mountain halted the Union advance on Gordonville and set the stage for the Southern victory at the Battle of Second Manassas three weeks later.

[Captions:]
Stonewall Jackson (left) defeated Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks at the Battle of Winchester on May 25, 1862. Three weeks after the Battle of Cedar Mountain, Banks's brother was killed while fighting Jackson's men at the Second Battle of Manassas.

This seven-stop, 1.25-mile walking trail will guide you through the Battle of Cedar Mountain. Please follow the posted arrows to find your way around the battlefield.
 
Erected by Civil War Trust; Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is May 25, 1862.
 
Location. 38° 24.234′ N, 78° 4.137′ W.

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Marker is near Rapidan, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is on General Winder Road (Virginia Route 657) 0.3 miles north of North James Madison Highway (U.S. 15). Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9593 N James Madison Hwy, Rapidan VA 22733, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 400 feet away); Hand-to-Hand Fighting (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 400 feet away); Cedar Mountain (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 700 feet away).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 19, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 25 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 19, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 12, 2021