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Charlotte in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence

 
 
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
1. Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Marker
Inscription.  On May 20, 1775, in a log courthouse near this spot, twenty seven patriot militia leaders debated and unanimously approved resolutions declaring themselves "free and independent” from Great Britain. known as the "Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence” it was the first Declaration of Independence in the American colonies. It is believed to have read in part:
"We the citizens of Mecklenburg County do hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance to the British crown."
President John Adams later wrote of the Mecklenburg Declaration, “The genuine sense of America at that moment was never so well expressed before, nor since."
On May 31, 1775, a new code of government for the county - known as the Mecklenburg Resolves was put into effect.
It declared in part that, “All laws and commissions confirmed by, or derived from the authority of the King or Parliament, are annulled and vacated, and the former civil constitution of these colonies for the present wholly suspended."
"The Resolves of the Committee of Mecklenburg,”
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Image image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
2. Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Image
Col. Polk reading the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence May 20, 1775
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North Carolina Royal Governor Josiah Martin wrote in June 1775, “Surpass all the horrid and treasonable publications that the inflammatory spirits of this continent have yet produced."
A local tavern owner, captain James Jack, delivered the Mecklenburg papers to the Continental Congress sometime in the summer of 1775, but North Carolina's congressional delegates deemed them "premature."
For this reason, the plaza around Trade & Tryon Streets has long been known as "Independence Square.” the date May 20, 1775 is on the North Carolina state flag and state seal to commemorate the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence.
 
Erected 2012 by The May 20th Society • Mecklenburg Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Revolutionary. A significant historical date for this entry is May 20, 1775.
 
Location. 35° 13.622′ N, 80° 50.595′ W. Marker is in Charlotte, North Carolina, in Mecklenburg County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Tryon Street and East Trade Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charlotte NC 28280, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nathanael Greene (within shouting distance of this marker); Mecklenburg Resolves (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Charlotte (within shouting distance of this marker); Jefferson Davis Informed of Lincoln's Death
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
3. Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); British Encampment, 1780 (about 600 feet away); The Last Meetings of the Confederate Cabinet (about 600 feet away); WBT/WBTV (about 700 feet away); Confederate Navy Yard (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlotte.
 
Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
4. Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Plaque
Located in front of the marker
It reads:


Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence
May 20, 1775
------------
Battle of Charlotte
Sept 26, 1780

The plaque reads:
From 1953 to 2012 this round marker was located in the middle of Trade and Tryon Streets. It replaced an earlier marker dating back to at least 1909. It was relocated to this location in May 2012 so that it might be better known to the public.
Given by the May 20th Society
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 18, 2021, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 18, 2021, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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Jun. 20, 2021