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Near Grindavik, Southern Peninsula Suđurnes, Iceland
 

Fallen But Not Forgotten

USAF, 8th Air Force, 93rd Bombardment Group, 330th Bombardment Squadron

 
 
Fallen But Not Forgotten Marker image. Click for full size.
By Oddgeir Karlsson, May 3, 2018
1. Fallen But Not Forgotten Marker
Inscription.  
Bandaríska B-24 Liberator - sprengjuflugvélin Hot Stuff, var fyrst flugvéla 8. flughersins til ađ ljtúka 25 árásarferđun frá Bretlandi yfir meginland Evrópu í heimsstyrjöldinni síđari.

The B-24 Liberator Hot Stuff was the first heavy bomber in the 8th Air Force to complete 25 missions in World War II.

Crewmembers:
Captain Robert H. “Shine” Shannon - Pilot,
Captain John H. Lentz - Copilot,
Captain James E. Gott – Navigator,
1st. Lt. Robert T. Jacobson – Bombardier,
Sgt. Kenneth A. Jeffers - Radio Operator,
Sgt. Joseph L. Craighead – Gunner,
Sgt. George A. Eisel – Tail Gunner,
Sgt. George D. Farley – Gunner,
Sgt. Paul H. McQueen – Gunner,
Sgt. Grant G. Rondeau – Engineer/Gunner,

Minnisvarđi ţessi er reistur í minningu bandarískra hermanna sem fórust međ B-24 Liberator - sprengjuflugvélinni Hot Stuff í Fagradalsfjalli 3. maí 1943

American heroes who perished when the B-24 Liberator Hot Stuff crashed on Mt. Fagradalsfjalli, on May 3, 1943:

Lt. General Frank Maxwell Andrews,
Commander

Dedication Ceremony, May 3, 2018 image. Click for full size.
2. Dedication Ceremony, May 3, 2018
Click or scan to see
this page online
of the European Theater of Operations,
Captain Robert H. Shannon - Pilot,
Lt. General Frank M. Andrews - Copilot,
Captain James E. Gott - Navigator,
Sgt. Kenneth A. Jeffers - Radio Operator,
Sgt Lloyd C. Weir - Crew Chief,
Sgt. Paul H. McQueen – Gunner,

Passengers:
Adna W. Leonard - Methodist Bishop and Chairman of the Corps of Chaplains,
Brig. Gen. Charles H. Barth - Andrews Chief of Staff,
Col. Morrow Krum - Andrews Aide,
Col. Frank L Miller - U.S. Army Chief of Chaplains,
Lt. Col. Fred A. Chapman - Andrews Aide,
Maj. Theodore Totman - Andrews Secretary,
Maj. Robert H. Humphrey – U.S. Army Chaplain,
Capt. Joseph T. Johnson - Andrews Aide

Surviving Crewmember:
Sgt George A. Eisel – Tail Gunner

 
Erected 2018 by Mr. Jim Lux.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in this topic list: War, World II. A significant historical date for this entry is May 3, 1943.
 
Location. 63° 55.407′ N, 22° 25.19′ W. Marker is near Grindavik, Southern Peninsula Suđurnes. Memorial is on Grindavíkurvegur (National Road 43) south of Reykjanesbraut (National Road 41), on the left when traveling south. The monument is on a roadside about 3 miles from the largely inaccessible mountainside where Hot Stuff went down. Touch for map. Marker is

Fallen But Not Forgotten Marker image. Click for full size.
By Doddi Marteinsson, May 3, 2020
3. Fallen But Not Forgotten Marker
May 3, 2020 is the 77th anniversary of the crash of Hot Stuff in Iceland.
in this post office area: Grindavik, Southern Peninsula Suđurnes 240, Iceland. Touch for directions.
 
More about this marker. In 2010, Jim Lux, a cold war Air Force veteran and retired IBM manager in Austin, Texas, was asked by Robert T. “Jake” Jacobson, 92 year-old World War II bombardier, to do some research about the 93rd Bombardment Group. It included a plane known as Hot Stuff, which, according to Jacobson, was the first WW II bomber in the 8th Air Force to fly 25 successful combat missions, a distinction that had been famously and erroneously given to the Memphis Belle.

Lux's research into Air Force records proved that Jacobson's claim was true. In 2012, Lux, who served in the Air Force from 1957 through 1962 went to Iceland and set out to find the mountain site where Hot Stuff went down many years ago.

Working with Icelandic brothers Thorsteinn and Ólafur Marteinsson, Lux located pieces of the wreckage. Lux returned home, inspired to raise money for a monument. Four golf tournaments and many other fundraising efforts later — including displaying Hot Stuff wreckage brought from the Iceland mountain — Lux had eclipsed the $100,000 goal he set for the project.

On May 3, the 75th anniversary of the crash, Lux and others gathered in Grindavik to dedicate the black granite monument designed by Lux and with the stainless steel model of the Hot Stuff created by Colorado artist Terry Hinde.

“U.S., Iceland remember WWII heroes with monument dedication,” said a recent headline on the U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa website.

“Their sacrifice and commitment to a cause far greater than themselves represents the proud heritage and tradition of honor that is the core identity of today’s U.S. Air Force,” Lt. Gen. Richard M. Clark, 3rd Air Force commander, said at the ceremony.
 
Regarding Fallen But Not Forgotten. Hot Stuff, the first U.S. plane in the 8th Air Force to fly more than 25 successful missions in World War II, crashed at Mt. Fagradalsfjall, near Grindavik, Iceland, on May 3, 1943, killing Lt General Frank Andrews and 13 others on board. There was one survivor. Hot Stuff had flown 31 missions and was scheduled to head back home to help sell war bonds.The Memphis Belle eventually returned home, did the war bond tour and became famous.

Hot Stuff's flight plan for the trip home changed en route when Lieutenant General Andrews boarded in England with members of his staff. In 1943 General Andrews was in overall command of the U.S. European Theater of Operations. From his headquarters in London, he directed both the American air campaign against Germany and the planning for the ground forces' invasion of Western Europe.

According to Gen. Ira Eaker, then-commander of the 8th Air Force, Andrews had been selected to command the Allied Forces for the invasion of Europe, a post subsequently given to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower.

As Commanding General of all U.S. Forces in the European Theater of Operations, General Andrews was known to be a strong advocate of air power in support of ground combat operations. He had also defied the
Hot Stuff Crew image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Army Air Force, circa 1943
4. Hot Stuff Crew
British on some significant issues, overcoming the RAF insistence on night bombing rather than daytime bombing. He was a force for the Brits, as well as the Germans, to reckon with.

Following General Andrews's death, responsibility for planning and executing the invasion of Europe fell to General Eisenhower - who, as other sources document, subsequently denied advance air strikes against D-Day invasion sites, and later deferred to British sensibility in conducting a “broad front” ground war on the continent - suppressing the potential for decisive rapid advances by US forces under Patton and others, and committing scarce resources to ineffective British operations, like Market-Garden, planned by British Field Marshall Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Story of Triumph and Tragedy (YouTube, Jim Lux, 18 min.). "The B-24 Liberator Hot Stuff, the first heavy bomber in the 8th Air Force to complete 25 missions in Europe in World War II crashed on the way back to the United States to tour the country and help sell war bonds on May 3, 1943. Onboard was Lt. Gen. Frank M. Andrews European Theater of Operations Commander and his staff and three chaplains. All onboard with killed except the tail gunner." (Submitted on July 11, 2018.)
Hot Stuff Crash Site, Mt. Fagradalsfjall, Iceland image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Army Air Force, May 1943
5. Hot Stuff Crash Site, Mt. Fagradalsfjall, Iceland
 

2. Hot Stuff (aircraft) (Wikipedia). (Submitted on July 11, 2018.)
3. A volcano near the crash site in Iceland may be named "Hot Stuff". Site is published in Icelandic language but translation apps can convert to English
"The eruption is not far from where Hot Stuff killed fourteen people. It has been suggested that the volcano be named Hot Stuff, in honor of the crew and passengers of a U.S. military plane that crashed on Mount Fagradal during World War II. Among those killed was the top US general in Europe."
(Submitted on March 30, 2021, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.) 

4. In Memory of Hot Stuff and General Andrews. A commemorative web site with photographs of the HOT STUFF monument created and maintained by an Icelandic tour agency: HIT ICELAND (Submitted on July 8, 2021.) 

5. World War II Crash Sites in Iceland. A web site documenting the work of Icelandic brothers Ólafur and Ţorsteinn Marteinsson in creating an interactive map of all WWII and post war military aircraft crash sites in Iceland with links to other sites of interest.
"Our hope is to see the crash sites preserved in some way, somewhat like the plaque unveiled in memory of the accident on Mt. Thorsteinn and Kasper Andersen MiklafellFagradalsfjall. This is a part Iceland´s history and should be remembered."
(Submitted on July 9, 2021, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.)
Lieutenant General Frank Maxwell Andrews image. Click for full size.
circa 1943
6. Lieutenant General Frank Maxwell Andrews
At the Casablanca Conference in January 1943, Lieut. Gen. Andrews was appointed commander of all United States forces in the European Theater of Operations, replacing Dwight D. Eisenhower. In his memoirs, Gen. Henry H. Arnold, commander of the Army Air Forces in World War II, expressed the belief that Andrews would have been given the command of the Allied invasion of Europe — the position that eventually went to Eisenhower.
 
 
A Consolidated B-24 Liberator Heavy Bomber image. Click for full size.
U.S. Air Force photograph via Wikipedia Commons, circa 1940
7. A Consolidated B-24 Liberator Heavy Bomber
This photo is not a photo of Hot Stuff. It is a different B-24, a B-24D with a length of 64 feet 8 inches and a wingspan of 110 feet. Photo archive description reads, “A Consolidated B-24 Liberator from Maxwell Field, Alabama, four engine pilot school, glistens in the sun as it makes a turn at high altitude in the clouds.”
Before The Belle image. Click for more information.
By Page Publishing, Inc.
8. Before The Belle
Based on official Air Force records and interviews the award winning 2016 book “Before the Belle” by Cassius Mullen and Betty Byron tells the story of Hot Stuff and her crew as they trained, deployed, flew combat missions, and met their tragic fate during WWII.
Click for more information.
American war memorial marker in Reykjavik (Fossvogur) War Graves Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, June 29, 2021
9. American war memorial marker in Reykjavik (Fossvogur) War Graves Cemetery
Hot Stuff crash victims were initially buried in the Reykjavik War Graves cemetery. After the war their remains were returned to the United States for reburial. The marker is inscribed: "To all Americans who served in Iceland during World War II. They gave their today for our tomorrow. Dedicated by the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. October 8, 2003 Captain Georges M Morrison CC"
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on June 24, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. This page has been viewed 670 times since then and 188 times this year. Last updated on June 15, 2021, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 28, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   3. submitted on May 3, 2020, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   4, 5. submitted on June 28, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   6. submitted on June 29, 2018.   7. submitted on May 4, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   8. submitted on July 12, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   9. submitted on July 5, 2021, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Nov. 29, 2021