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Atwood in Rawlins County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Frontier in Rawlins County

 
 
Frontier in Rawlins County Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 5, 2021
1. Frontier in Rawlins County Marker
Inscription.  The vast expanse of High Plains that today encompasses Rawlins County was once home and hunting ground to Cheyenne, Comanche, and Arapaho Indians. With continued railroad construction and the growth of permanent settlements, American westward expansion during the 1860s and 1870s threatened these lands, resulting in increased tension and armed conflict.

On April 23, 1875, the final violent act in the so-called Red River War occurred about 14 miles south of here on Sappa Creek. Waged mainly in Texas, the war ended with the Comanches’ surrender. But a group of about 75 Northern Cheyennes who had fought alongside the Comanches escaped to the north. While camped on Sappa Creek, 40 men of the Sixth U.S. Cavalry attacked them. Two troopers and almost 30 Indians—men, women, and children—were killed. The brutality of this surprise dawn attack remained a bitter memory, perhaps helping explain the murder of more than 30 settlers on Sappa and Beaver Creeks in Rawlins and adjoining Decatur County during the Cheyennes’ famous trek north in the autumn of 1878.

The following year, the city of Atwood was established. It became the seat of county government

Frontier in Rawlins County Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 5, 2021
2. Frontier in Rawlins County Marker
(looking east • Atwood Lake Park in background)
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when Rawlins County was organized in 1881.
 
Erected by State of Kansas. (Marker Number 85.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Kansas Historical Society series list. A significant historical date for this entry is April 23, 1875.
 
Location. 39° 48.839′ N, 101° 2.688′ W. Marker is in Atwood, Kansas, in Rawlins County. Marker is at the intersection of Lake Road and North 2nd Street, on the left when traveling east on Lake Road. Marker is located near the Atwood Lake Park parking lot, on the south side of Atwood Lake. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Atwood KS 67730, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Red River War (Wikipedia). The "Red River War", as it was called, led to the end of the culture and way of life for the Southern Plains tribes and brought an end to the Plains tribes, as a people. The campaign of the Red River War was fought during a time when buffalo hunters were hunting the great American Bison nearly to extinction. Both the Bison and the people who lived off it nearly became extinct at the same time. (Submitted on July 9, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Sixth Regiment of Cavalry. A party of Cheyennes broke north, and having been
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seen crossing the railroad, Lieutenant Austin Henely with 40 men of Troop H pursued rapidly until April 23, when he overtook the band at Sappa Creek, Kansas. The Indians made a stand and they were fought at close quarters to the bitter end. Twenty-seven Indians were killed; 134 ponies, with all their camp property and arms were captured. (Submitted on July 9, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Atwood, Kansas (Wikipedia). In 1875, T.A. Andrews and J.M. Matheny traveled to Rawlins County and started a town site about two miles east of the current city. The city of Attwood (with two t's) was named after Attwood Matheny, the 14-year-old son who accompanied his father on the journey. In 1882, the U.S. Post Office requested permission to drop one "t" thus becoming Atwood. (Submitted on July 9, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 9, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 158 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 9, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Dec. 2, 2022