Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Upper Sandusky in Wyandot County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Ferree

Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail

 
 
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2008
1. Fort Ferree Marker
Inscription.  
1,000 feet east - site of
Fort Ferree

Main headquarters of General
William H. Harrison's army in
the War of 1812.

Many of his soldiers who
died in battle are buried in
this courthouse yard.

 
Erected 1930 by Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission. (Marker Number C481.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission marker series.
 
Location. 40° 49.642′ N, 83° 16.87′ W. Marker is in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, in Wyandot County. Marker is at the intersection of S. Sandusky Avenue (Ohio Route 53) and E. Wyandot Avenue (U.S. 30), on the right when traveling north on S. Sandusky Avenue. This historical marker is located in downtown Upper Sandusky, Ohio, on the northwest corner of the front lawn of the Wyandot County courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 109 S Sandusky Ave, Upper Sandusky OH 43351, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wyandot County Courthouse & The Shawshank Redemption (here, next to this marker);
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2008
2. Fort Ferree Marker
This historical marker as viewed in the Northwest corner of the Wyandot County courthouse front lawn.
Stephan Lumber Company / “The Shawshank Redemption” Woodshop (approx. mile away); Wyandot Indian Council House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Col. William Crawford (approx. 0.3 miles away); Wyandott Indian Mission (approx. 0.6 miles away); Departure of the Wyandot Indians (approx. 0.6 miles away); John Stewart (approx. 0.7 miles away); Wyandot Mission Church (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Upper Sandusky.
 
More about this marker. There is a related historical marker regarding Fort Ferrre, located 1,000 feet to the east, on the old Lincoln Highway (modern day US 30), on the original site of the fort.

That being said, this particular featured historical marker is part of the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail series (type C) which was put in place in 1930 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Ohio's Revolutionary War era Battle of Piqua, by the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission.

In order to accomplish this, in 1929 the state of Ohio created the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission, and then in 1930 this commission created 22 military trails, throughout western Ohio, between Cincinnati, Ohio on the state's southern border and Toledo, Ohio on the state's northern border. Each of these military trails represented the routes, or trails, used by military leaders during either the Revolutionary War, the Indian Wars of 1790 to 1795, or the War of 1812. Each of these military routes connected various related historical sites, that were marked with Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission (type C) markers, along each of the military trails.

The routes of these military trails were in turn marked by type A and type B Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission markers that served as directional (type B) and distance (type A) markers.

Originally, back in 1930, there were erected 70 some of these Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission, type C, markers. To date, there are only 20 some of them that have been located and posted on the Historical Marker database. A number of them are presently missing, and presumed to be permanently lost.

Of the 20 some original markers that have been included in the historical marker database only a small number of them have the original art work, sometimes referred to as silhouettes, across the top of the historical marker. This is a feature that makes these markers quite unique from most other historical markers. This "Fort Ferree" marker is one of those very few markers.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail System. A description of the Revolutionary Memorial Trail System developed by the state of Ohio in 1929 - 1930. (Submitted on November 17, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Cartographic Map of the (Western) Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail, 1930. This is a link to information provided by the Midpointe Library System. Middletown, Trenton, West Chester, Ohio (Submitted on September 2, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Additional comments.
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2008
3. Fort Ferree Marker
View of the marker that is located approximately 1,000 feet to the east of this marker, in front of the local Elk Lodge, at the original site of Fort Ferree.

1. Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail System.
Back in 2008, while I was attempting to post as many War of 1812 related markers as I could find, in preparation for the approaching Bicentennial celebration of the War of 1812, I began to discover (quite be accident) the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail System. As I started to read about this network of markers, that was originally erected back in 1930 as part of Ohio's 150 year celebration of its involvement in the American Revolutionary War, I came to realize that it was also a potentially excellent source of historical markers that featured information regarding Ohio's role in the War of 1812. The Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission (ORMC) had published a 1931 planning report that listed all of the historical markers that had been commissioned to be erected, listing each marker by county, with text included, and of the nearly 70 markers erected, close to 25 of them featured information regarding War of 1812 related historical events and locations.

Unfortunately I soon discovered that there were more of these 1930 era markers that were missing than what had survived. So that made it all the more satisfying each time that I was able to discover, and post on the Historical Marker database, a surviving ORMC marker.

Well the Bicentennial Celebration of the War of 1812 has come
Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail Map image. Click for full size.
Image courtesy of the MidPointe Library System (www.MidPointeLibrary.org)
4. Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail Map
A view of an original Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Trail Map, from 1930. For a better view double click on this picture.
and gone, and the focus is no longer on rushing to discover and post all of Ohio's War of 1812 related historical markers. So in the spirit of taking the time to relax and to smell the roses, that's just what I have been doing with the ORMC markers. In doing so, I noticed something about these markers that I had completely overlooked before.

To the best of my knowledge, of the 70 some ORMC, Type C, markers, that were originally erected back in 1930, there are 23 that are still standing. Of the 23 ORMC, Type C, markers that are still standing, only 16 of them still have the marker's unique silhouette art work attached to the top of the marker.

It is my impression, that the ORMC markers, were the only marker series ever commissioned in the state of Ohio that had silhouette art work attached across the top of each marker. What makes these markers even more interesting, at least to me, is that the silhouette art work, that was featured across the top of each ORMC marker was seemingly unique to each marker, and the artwork was made to relate to the historical event featured in the text of each marker.

So, having now come to better appreciate the significance of this rare silhouette art work feature, I have decided to try and go back to each of these surviving 16 markers, and to better feature and record for the historical record, the silhouettes on each of
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 6, 2016
5. Fort Ferree Marker
Close-up view of the marker, with silhouette art work across the top of the marker included in the picture.
these surviving ORMC markers.
    — Submitted April 7, 2016, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryWar of 1812
 
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 6, 2016
6. Fort Ferree Marker
Close-up view of the unique silhouette art work that is featured across the top of this marker.
Fort Ferree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 6, 2016
7. Fort Ferree Marker
A distant view of the marker as seen in the northwest corner of the Wyandot County courthouse front lawn.
Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission Marker Types image. Click for full size.
Image provided by Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission publication, dated 1931., June 26, 2019
8. Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission Marker Types
View of the three types of markers used by the Ohio Revolutionary Memorial Commission. The marker on the left is a type A marker, the marker in the middle is a type C (just like our featured marker), and the marker on the right is a type B. For a better view double click on this picture.
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Ferree.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 19, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,558 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 19, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   4. submitted on September 2, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   5, 6, 7. submitted on April 7, 2016, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   8. submitted on June 28, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement