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Maskwacis in Ponoka County, Alberta — Canada’s Prairie Region (North America)
 

Maskipeton

Alberta's History

 
 
Maskipeton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2022
1. Maskipeton Marker
Inscription.  
Who was Maskipeton? He was a Cree, born around 1807. He became chief and led a Cree band that hunted south of today's Edmonton, but that also ranged into Saskatchewan and Montana. He traded into the Missouri River area. He was a warrior, respected by his people and feared by his enemies.

He may have been a traveler. A man called Maskipeton, or Broken Arm, accepted an invitation to go to Washington in 1831 to meet President Andrew Jackson. He had his portrait painted on the way in St. Louis.

He was a guide, taking parties of white settlers through the mountains in 1841, 1851, and 1854. He guided and counseled Captain John Palliser from near Fort Qu'Appelle to the elbow of the South Saskatchewan River in 1857. Maskipeton told the party to cut wood in the river valleys and haul it with them on their carts. There would be no wood on the prairie.

He was a thinker and a statesman. A friend to the missionaries, he shared letters and hospitality with Robert Terrill Rundle. He noted the differences in Christian teachings, and the strength of native spiritual beliefs. He received travelers eagerly, spreading fine buffalo robes
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and food before artist Paul Kane and talking late into the night. He represented the Cree people in 1855, signing Lame Bull's Treaty between the Blackfoot Confederacy and the United States government.

He was a peacemaker who forgave his father's killer, and tried to end hostilities between the Cree and the Blackfoot, Blood, and Peigan tribes. He was said to walk unarmed and alone into Blackfoot camps as a sign of peace. Or were these actions a sign of a great warrior who did not fear his enemies? He died in 1869 at the hands of Big Swan, a Blackfoot.
 
Erected by Alberta Historical Resources Foundation.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #07 Andrew Jackson series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1807.
 
Location. 52° 49.761′ N, 113° 26.878′ W. Marker is in Maskwacis, Alberta, in Ponoka County. Marker is on Provincial Highway 2A, half a kilometer south of Ermineskin Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Marker is located in a pull-out on the east side of the highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Maskwacis AB T0C 1N0, Canada. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 18 kilometers of this
Marker detail: A Cree camp, Hobbema, possibly 1890s image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Glenbow Archives, Calgary, NA-682-6
2. Marker detail: A Cree camp, Hobbema, possibly 1890s
marker, measured as the crow flies. Wetaskiwin Water Tower (approx. 16.3 kilometers away); Wetaskiwin Post Office (approx. 16.4 kilometers away); Wetaskiwin Court House/La Palais de Justice de Wetaskiwin (approx. 16.4 kilometers away); Railway Station (approx. 16.5 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Maskepetoon (c. 1807–1869).
A renowned Cree leader and warrior. He was a highly respected peacemaker, due to his negotiation of truces between the Cree and other First Nations. In the early to mid-1820s, his tribe struggled with starvation as well as ongoing conflict. This meant that Maskepetoon would have had to take up the role of a soldier, being put in positions of guarding the camp and scouting for any potential threats. Born during a time of fluctuating war and peace for his tribe, the year before his birth there was a breakdown in Cree-Blackfoot relations. This breakdown in relations resulted in a conflict between the Cree and various other First Nations—Peigan, Siksika and Blood—as well as the Blackfoot.
(Submitted on September 20, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Maskepetoon (Broken Arm, Crooked Arm, baptized Abraham).
Late in 1831, while on a trading expedition to Fort Union on the Missouri River, Maskepetoon was invited to accompany
Marker detail: Sketch of Maskipeton in his later years image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Glenbow Archives, Calgary, NA-4169-1
3. Marker detail: Sketch of Maskipeton in his later years
three other chiefs, from the Assiniboin, Saulteaux, and Sioux tribes, to Washington, D.C., to meet President Andrew Jackson who wanted to establish peaceful relations with the western tribes and also to impress them with the might of his government. While in St Louis en route east, Maskepetoon was painted by the celebrated artist George Catlin.
(Submitted on September 20, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Maskipeton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2022
4. Maskipeton Marker
(looking east from Alberta Highway 2A)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 20, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 102 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 20, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 25, 2024