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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fleeing for Their Lives

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. July 9, 1864

 

— Monocacy National Battlefield, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
Fleeing for Their Lives Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Fleeing for Their Lives Marker
Inscription.  
Distressed that their main escape route had been burned, the stranded Federal skirmishers fought on as they faced periodic Confederate attacks. Late in the afternoon, they gradually fell back towards the Baltimore & Ohio bridge.

About 5:00 p.m., they noticed their compatriots retreating across the Gambrill Mill property toward the Baltimore Pike and fled across the railroad bridge to join them. The skirmishers had protected the Union center and the escape route toward Baltimore. "Your people," Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace wrote 1st Lt. George E. Davis, "held their position with great tenacity."

... we kept together and crossed the railroad bridge, stepping upon the ties, there being no floor. The enemy were at our heels, and before we could get away...[took some] prisoners. One man fell through the bridge to the river, forty feet below, and was taken to Andersonville.
1st Lt. George E. Davis
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is July 1864.
 
Location.
Fleeing for Their Lives Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Fleeing for Their Lives Marker
The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad bridge over the Monocacy River can be seen in the background of the photo.
Click or scan to see
this page online
This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. 39° 22.159′ N, 77° 23.288′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling north. Located along a walking trail at the Gambrill Mill (stop five on the driving tour of Monocacy Battlefield), which on a lane off the right side (east) of Urbana Pike. The marker is located on an overlook of the Monocacy River. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Burning the Bridge (a few steps from this marker); Desperate Escape (within shouting distance of this marker); Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away); Bush Creek Crossing (about 700 feet away); Gambrill Mill (about 700 feet away); Retreat (about 700 feet away); A Bold Plan (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. Beside the text is a portrait of "First Lt. George E. Davis of the 10th Vermont Infantry," who "received the Medal of Honor for his heroic leadership in defense of the bridges." The portrait is complemented by an image of the Medal of Honor. On the right of the marker is a drawing of the Union skirmishers retreating, "After holding off Confederates most of the day, Union skirmishers fled to safety across the railroad bridge."

This marker was replaced by a new one named Desperate Escape (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Park Service site. (Submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related
Trail Stop Overlooking the River image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Trail Stop Overlooking the River
markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
The Modern Day B&O Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 29, 2007
4. The Modern Day B&O Bridge
View of the Bridge from the West Side image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
5. View of the Bridge from the West Side
The modern day view of the route Davis and his men took across the Monocacy.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 30, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,431 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Apr. 17, 2021