Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fayetteville in Franklin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop

 
 
Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
1. Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop Marker
Inscription. The stone walls of this old building have withstood the adversities of time and people to stand in mute testament of historical events that helped shape a nation.

Built in 1837, partners John Paxton and Thaddeus Stevens erected a blacksmith shop along the Chambersburg Pike as part of the Caledonia Iron Works. Following the Battle of Gettysburg only the stone walls remained. The shop was rebuilt and operated until 1895, twenty years after the iron furnace closed.

Thaddeus Stevens, businessman, lawyer, congressman, and father of the 14th Amendment, is perhaps the most famous unknown person in American history. During the Civil War it was Stevens who kept pressure on President Lincoln to use African-Americans as soldiers and to free the slaves.

Following the burning of Steven's Caledonia Iron Works, now the site of Caledonia State Park, Stevens provided support for the unemployed families for as long as three years.

A Virginian, West Point graduate and state legislator, Jubal Early voted against secession, but returned to the army in defense of his state. Against direct orders not to destroy private property during the invasion of Pennsylvania, General Early, finding in his way the iron works of Congressman Stevens, who was advocating the most vindictive measures of confiscation and devastation against
Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 29, 2008
2. Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop Marker
the south stated, "I [am] determined to destroy them." On June 26, 1863, Early put the Caledonia Iron Works to the torch.
 
Erected by Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln Highway marker series.
 
Location. 39° 54.407′ N, 77° 28.721′ W. Marker is near Fayetteville, Pennsylvania, in Franklin County. Marker is at the intersection of Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30) and State Route 233, on the right when traveling west on Lincoln Highway. Touch for map. Located in Caledonia State Park, near the crossing of the Appalachian Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Fayetteville PA 17222, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Good Roads Jubilee / The Lincoln Highway (within shouting distance of this marker); Caledonia Furnace (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Caledonia Furnace (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Jemison (approx. 2.9 miles away); Chestnut Spring (approx. 5.6 miles away); Conklin Hall (approx. 5.6 miles away); Penn State Mont Alto Campus (approx. 5.6 miles away); George H. Wirt (approx. 5.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fayetteville.
 
More about this marker.
Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
3. Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop
On the left side of the marker are photos of the shop at various stages of its history. Over the years, the blacksmith shop served as park office, trolley station, pool concession and a museum. In 1903 the ironworks became the second forest recreation park in Pennsylvania. The Chambersburg Trolley Company leased Caledonia Park in 1905. The blacksmith shop found new life as a trolley station. On the right are portraits of Stevens and Early.
 
Also see . . .
1. Thaddeus Stevens. A biography with more information about the political side of Steven's work. (Submitted on September 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Thaddeus Stevens Society. The Thaddeus Stevens Society is a non-profit group dedicated to promoting the memory of Thaddeus Stevens. (Submitted on May 3, 2009, by Thaddeus Stevens Society of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.) 

3. The Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. (Submitted on June 3, 2009, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
4. Thaddeus Stevens Blacksmith Shop
A view from the park side of the shop.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,125 times since then and 192 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on December 3, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3, 4. submitted on September 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement