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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carthage in Moore County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Plank Road

 
 
Plank Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dynasty Shaurice Gilmore, November 24, 2016
1. Plank Road Marker
Inscription. This street is the route of Fayetteville-to-Salem plank road, a toll road 129 miles long, built 1849-54.
 
Erected 1948 by Archives, Conservation and Highway Departments. (Marker Number K 26.)
 
Location. 35° 20.715′ N, 79° 24.97′ W. Marker is in Carthage, North Carolina, in Moore County. Marker is at the intersection of Monroe Street (State Highway 24/27) and North McNeill Street (State Highway 22), on the right when traveling west on Monroe Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 109 Monroe St, Carthage NC 28327, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buggy Company (approx. 0.2 miles away); John McConnell (approx. 0.2 miles away); East Meets West (approx. 1.2 miles away); Lt. Robert "Hoyle" Upchurch (approx. 1.2 miles away); Ret. SFC Zeb D. Harrington and The "Junkyard Dog" (approx. 1.2 miles away); Biography of Robert Hoyle Upchurch (approx. 1.2 miles away); James Rogers McConnell (approx. 1.2 miles away); James McConnell (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carthage.
 
Regarding Plank Road. The Fayetteville-Western Road extended 129 miles from Fayetteville to High
Plank Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dynasty Shaurice Gilmore, November 24, 2016
2. Plank Road Marker
Point and from their to Salem with side courses that passed through Spout Springs and Gulf, and also a route that ran from Cameron to Carthage to Asheboro.

The plank road movement in North Carolina came to success in the late 1840's. 1842, Governor John Motley Morehead had suggested the construction of a road giving transportation from Fayetteville to western North Carolina. In 1848, Governor William A. Graham argued that our state had a disadvantage with transportation then any other state in the union. He saw it necessary to improve our roads. This lead to North Carolina chartering its first plank road along a route observed by University of North Carolina Professor Elisha Mitchell, extending from Fayetteville to Raleigh west and eventually to Georgia. This was important because it helped provide transportation through North Carolina even though this plank road didn't last long because of the growth of railroads in North Carolina.
 
Also see . . .
1. Plank Roads. North Carolina History Project (Submitted on November 29, 2016.) 

2. Fayetteville and Western Plank Road. North Carolina History Project (Submitted on November 29, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkMan-Made FeaturesRoads & Vehicles
 
Plank Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dynasty Shaurice Gilmore, November 24, 2016
3. Plank Road Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 28, 2016, by Dynasty Shaurice Gilmore of Rocky Mount, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 194 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 28, 2016, by Dynasty Shaurice Gilmore of Rocky Mount, North Carolina. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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