Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Steele in Regional District of East Kootenay, British Columbia — The Canadian Pacific
 

Fort Steele

 
 
Fort Steele Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 19, 1997
1. Fort Steele Marker
Inscription. Gold miners poured into this area in the 1860’s crossing the Kootenay River at the foot of this street. The settlement that grew up here was first called Galbraith’s Ferry.

In 1887 the N.W.M.P. established a post here when friction developed between local natives and newly arrived ranchers. Spt. Sam Steele and 75 men maintained order and when they left one year later, the village changed its name to Fort Steele.

Fort Steele boomed in the 90’s as a center of river traffic and speculation; however, when the railway bypassed the town in 1898, its population plummeted.
 
Location. 49° 36.942′ N, 115° 37.818′ W. Marker is in Fort Steele, British Columbia, in Regional District of East Kootenay. Marker is on Provincial Highway 93/95 just from St. Mary's Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Steele, British Columbia V0B 1N0, Canada.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Steele (Wikipedia). Fort Steele was a gold rush boom town founded in 1864 by John Galbraith. The town was originally called "Galbraith's Ferry", named after the ferry set up by the city's founder over the Kootenay River. It was the only ferry within several hundred miles so Mr.Galbraith charged very high prices to get across. The town was
Wasa Hotel Museum-Fort Steele image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 19, 1997
2. Wasa Hotel Museum-Fort Steele
renamed Fort Steele in 1888, after legendary Canadian lawman Superintendent Sam Steele of the North-West Mounted Police solved a dispute between a settler who had unjustly accused one of the local First Nations men with murder. This dispute had caused a great deal of tension between the town and the native people. Sam Steele, finding no real evidence against the accused natives, had the charges against them lifted. Both the town and the First Nations people were so grateful that they renamed the town Fort Steele. Much to Steele's dismay, the "Fort" part of the name comes from the NWMP setting up a station in the town, whereas the town itself was never a real fort.
(Submitted on December 1, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Sign at the entrance to Fort Steele Heritage Town image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 19, 1997
3. Sign at the entrance to Fort Steele Heritage Town
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 1, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 220 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 1, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement