Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charlottesville in Albemarle County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Horses & Mules

 
 
Horses & Mules Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
1. Horses & Mules Marker
Inscription. The Eagle. Peacemaker. Tecumseh. Bremo. Wellington. Diomede. These were the six carriage and saddle horses, plus one mule, stabled here in 1821. As many as 30 riding and carriage horses, workhorses, and mules were stabled at various locations on the plantation. Visitors' horses were accommodated in stalls under the North Terrace of the main house. In 1793, a "stable" of linked log structures over 100 feet long was built at this site. The structure you see, however, is what remains of a larger L-shaped stable constructed by hired stonemasons in 1808. Both stables housed Jefferson's prized riding and carriage horses, the occasional mule or milk cow, tack, and fodder.

... to old age, the daily ride is among the most cheering of comforts... and so necessary is this daily revival to me, that I would wish to lose that and life together.
Thomas Jefferson, 1824

The Hostlers
After the death of chief hostler and coachman Jupiter, Wormley Hughes assumed responsibility for the Mulberry Row stable around 1808. One of Jefferson's "most trusty servants," Hughes took over the care and feeding of the horses and upkeep of the saddles, harnesses, and carriages. Years later, Hughes, who also served as head gardener, could "distinctly remember, and described the points, height, color, pace, temper, etc., of
Horses & Mules Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
2. Horses & Mules Marker
every horse." He often drove Jefferson family members and carted plantation goods throughout central Virginia.

Making a Carriage
Jefferson designed a carriage and noted on March 21, 1814 that •Johnny Hem[m]ings begun the body of a Landau Jan. 12. and finished it this day." With assistance from two other enslaved men-Lewis, a joiner, and the blacksmith Joseph Fossett-Hemmings built this elaborate, four-wheeled carriage in "9 weeks + 5 days." It was usually drawn by four horses and controlled by two enslaved boys riding as postilions.

"The Daily Ride"
Jefferson remained an avid horseman throughout his life. He viewed his daily ride as physical exercise—the horse was "the most sovereign of all Doctors." His rides also allowed him to monitor plantation agriculture and industry; after 1809, he was "mostly on horseback, attending to my farms or other concerns." In his lifetime, Jefferson, who was "passionately fond of a good horse," bought, sold, and occasionally bred dozens of horses, many of them valued for their English bloodlines.

(Marker Number 04.)
 
Location. 38° 0.606′ N, 78° 27.039′ W. Marker is near Charlottesville, Virginia, in Albemarle County. Marker can be reached from Thomas Jefferson Parkway. Touch for map. Marker is
Horses & Mules Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
3. Horses & Mules Marker
horseshoe fragment, iron
Snaffle bit, iron
on the grounds of Monticello—entrance fee is required. Marker is in this post office area: Charlottesville VA 22902, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Slave Housing (within shouting distance of this marker); Mulberry Row (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Textiles (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Mulberry Row (about 400 feet away); Ice House (about 600 feet away); Smokehouse/Dairy (about 600 feet away); The Levy Legacy (about 600 feet away); North Terrace Wing (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
More about this marker. This is marker #04-titled "Stable"-in the "Mulberry Row at Monticello - Landscape of Slavery" panel series (link to series provided on this page).
 
Also see . . .  Mulberry Row at Monticello - Landscape of Slavery panel series. (Submitted on December 3, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.)
 
Categories. African AmericansAnimalsPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & Settlers
 
<i>Diomed</i> by George Stubbs, 19th century image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
4. Diomed by George Stubbs, 19th century
Diomed, a famous British racehorse who later served as a stud horse in Virginia, was the ancestor of several of Jefferson's horses.
Horses & Mules Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
5. Horses & Mules Marker
Jefferson's partial sketch for a landau, n.d., superimposed on a 19th century diagram of a whole carriage
Jefferson's riding boots image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
6. Jefferson's riding boots
Horses & Mules Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
7. Horses & Mules Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 3, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 167 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 3, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   2. submitted on December 4, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 3, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
Paid Advertisement