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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Klamath Falls in Klamath County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Eulalona

Indian Village

 
 
Eulalona Indian Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, May 31, 2015
1. Eulalona Indian Village Marker
Inscription.
A Populous Settlement
On Both Sides Of The River
Before The White Man's Era

 
Erected 1934 by Eulalona Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 42° 14.308′ N, 121° 48.406′ W. Marker is in Klamath Falls, Oregon, in Klamath County. Marker can be reached from Lakeshore Drive (Route 630), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at Putnams Point. Marker is at or near this postal address: 601 Lakeshore Drive, Klamath Falls OR 97601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Oregon History - Upper Klamath Lake (approx. 0.4 miles away); Whitlock House (approx. 1 miles away); Marion Apartments (approx. 1 miles away); Pioneer Furtrader (approx. 1.6 miles away); George Nurse (In Memory of) (approx. 1.6 miles away); Locomotive 2579 (approx. 1.6 miles away); This Marks the Road to Topsy Grade (approx. 1.8 miles away); Van Brimmer Cabin 1864-1928 (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Klamath Falls.
 
Regarding Eulalona. This historical
Eulalona Indian Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, May 31, 2015
2. Eulalona Indian Village Marker
marker once resided inside Moore Park but was relocated for the third time to its present location and re-dedicated in 2015. After doing some research and discovering a local website by the Eulalona Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, I found out that this historical marker was originally monumented above the Link River and was removed and placed in Moore Park and re-dedicated on June 21, 1959.

The Eulalona Indian Village that this marker refers to was once a Native American settlement where much salmon fishing was done along the Link River. During the summer months the Klamath Indians (the City of Klamath Falls is named after this tribe) were scattered throughout the Klamath Basin hunting and fishing and led more nomadic lifestyles. But when the first frosts came into the Basin annually, many tribesmen and women would make camp in and around the headwaters of the Link River for the winter and have enough food from the deer and salmon they caught and dried to sustain them for months on end. This village was also a trading post with many peoples of the area for fish, furs and other necessities.

For non-locals who visit this site, there are no longer any salmon runs along the Link River and haven't been for over 100 years. There has been an ever-growing movement lately between environmental organizations and government bodies to possibly restore
Eulalona Indian Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, May 31, 2015
3. Eulalona Indian Village Marker
the salmon runs from the Klamath River to Upper Klamath Lake. That would mean the destruction of the Link River Dam that retains waterflows from Upper Klamath Lake to Lake Ewauna and into the Klamath River. I don't personally see that happening anytime soon, but it would definitely be a neat experience to see salmon swimming back into these waters again, much like the days before the white man's era.
 
Also see . . .  Eulalona Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution. Additional markers placed by the Eulalona Chapter. (Submitted on December 4, 2016, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 7, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2016, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 242 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 4, 2016, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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