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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charlottesville in Albemarle County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

North Terrace Wing

 
 
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
1. North Terrace Wing Marker
Inscription. What you see here is a reconstruction of the North Terrace wing. The original wing, built 1801-05, housed Jefferson's carriages and the horses and carriages of visitors; most of Jefferson's horses were stabled at the east end of Mulberry Row. Horses and carriages were essential modes of transportation in Jefferson's era. Over the course of his lifetime, Jefferson bought, sold, commissioned, and designed many types of carriages for his own use. These varied from simple one-horse, self-driven gigs to coaches drawn teams of horses controlled by enslaved postilions. Israel Gillette often rode postilion on Jefferson's annual trip to his Poplar Forest plantation.

Travelling in the phaeton Mr. Jefferson used oftentimes to take the reins himself & drive. Whenever he wanted to travel fast drive he'd drive: would drive powerful hard himself.
Reminiscences of former Monticello slave Isaac (Granger) Jefferson, 1847

Carriages
In 1782, Jefferson designed a phaeton (a small, two-passenger, open-bodied carriage) constructed at Monticello by William Orr, a hired smith, and Davy Watson, a hired joiner. Jefferson took it to France where he acquired cabriolets with folding tops, chariots (traveling chaises smaller than coaches), and a crane neck-style chariot made in London.
During his presidency,
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
2. North Terrace Wing Marker
A Phaeton with a Pair of Cream Ponies in the Charge of a Stable-Lad
by George Stubbs, 1780—85.
Yale Center for British Art / The Bridgeman Art Library

Jefferson purchased a sulky, a gig, a double phaeton, and a $1200 Philadelphia-made chariot that saw little use. He sold the chariot upon his retirement for $500.

Jefferson's Design
The tack room, horse stalls, and carriage bays here were reconstructed in the late 1930s. They had fallen into disrepair in the late 1800s and were completely gone by the turn of the 20th century. Study of photographs and the subsequent discovery of additional Jefferson documents indicate that Jefferson's plans for this wing differed from what you see today.

 
Location. 38° 0.65′ N, 78° 27.16′ W. Marker is near Charlottesville, Virginia, in Albemarle County. Marker can be reached from Thomas Jefferson Parkway. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of Monticello—entrance fee is required. Marker is in this post office area: Charlottesville VA 22902, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ice House (within shouting distance of this marker); Barrier (within shouting distance of this marker); Mulberry Row (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Textiles (about 500 feet away); Smokehouse/Dairy (about 500 feet away); The Levy Legacy
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
3. North Terrace Wing Marker
Jefferson designed a second phaeton, built by James Dinsmore, a hired joiner, and William Stewart, a hired smith, ca. 1802. The seat survives at Monticello.
(about 500 feet away); Discovering Mulberry Row (about 500 feet away); Slave Housing (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
Categories. African AmericansPatriots & PatriotismRoads & Vehicles
 
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
4. North Terrace Wing Marker
Jefferson's drawing of a landau body, n.d.
Massachusetts Historical Society

Jefferson's sketch of a folding landau top, 1801.
Library of Congress

In 1815, Jefferson was obliged "to relinquish the use of the gigg in travelling on account of fatigue, for that of a 4 wheeled carriage." Jefferson then designed a third carriage, a landau. It was the only taxable vehicle in his possession after 1823.
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
5. North Terrace Wing Marker
View toward the North Pavilion, ca. 1938. Architects excavated the site seeking clues about the configuration of the North Terrace wing.
North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
6. North Terrace Wing Marker
(Top)
Probable arrangement of horse stalls and carriage bays based on Jefferson's notations (below)

(Lower Right)
Jefferson's notes, ca. 1802, indicated that four bays were to house his carriages; four were for strangers' (visitors') carriages and horses, and one for a store room. The sketch illustrated how to secure the bays with double doors, strap hinges, and locks.
Massachusetts Historical Society

North Terrace Wing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, August 1, 2012
7. North Terrace Wing Marker
(Note: The Ice House marker is the one around the corner.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 172 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 16, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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