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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stonycreek Township in Somerset County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Field of Honor

 
 
A Field of Honor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 15, 2016
1. A Field of Honor Marker
Inscription.
A Common Field


This land is first settled in the late 1700s. For a century and a half, much of the area remains wooded, with cultivated fields and pastures surrounding a few scattered farmhouses and barns.

Beginning in the 1950s, mining reshapes the landscape. Huge machines scrape away layers of soil and rock to reveal long, black seams of coal. Enormous trucks travel this road, hauling away coal to steel mills and power plants. Coal mining brings people and jobs.

In the mid-1990s, surface mining of these lands ends. Although unused mining equipment and industrial buildings litter the area, the rocky land is being reclaimed. Coarse grasses and small trees are planted, mine water is treated to improve its quality, and wildlife is returning.

A Field of Honor

On September 11, 2001, the land is transformed again by the actions of the passengers and crew of United Airlines Right 93. Because of their struggle with terrorists, the airplane crashes - just two miles ahead and not at the terrorists' intended target in Washington, D.C. At the site of the crash, a memorial and verdant trees, grasses, and wildflowers embrace this land. Millions of people from around the world come to pay their respects.
 
Location. 40° 3.968′ 
A Field of Honor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 15, 2016
2. A Field of Honor Marker
N, 78° 53.725′ W. Marker is in Stonycreek Township, Pennsylvania, in Somerset County. Marker is on Approach Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stoystown PA 15563, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. September 11, 2001 (approx. 0.7 miles away); Flight 93 National Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); Flight 93 Temporary Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Flight 93 National Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); Flight 93 (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Flight 93 National Memorial (approx. one mile away); “We're going to do something.” (approx. 1.1 miles away); America Attacked! (approx. 1.1 miles away).
 
Categories. DisastersIndustry & Commerce
 
The Stahl House and Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 15, 2016
3. The Stahl House and Barn
The house and barn on the Marcus and Lulu Stahl farm, pictured here on a snowy day in 1945, stood just south of here.
Close-up of photo on marker
Surface Mining image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 15, 2016
4. Surface Mining
The extent of surface mining on this property is evident in this photo taken in 1978. The red and white machine is a dragline which removes soil and rock to expose seams of coal. When surface mining ended here in 1995, the dragline was parked on a nearby hilltop where it remained until it was sold for scrap in 2008.
Close-up of photo on marker
Dragline image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 15, 2016
5. Dragline
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 20, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 19, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 190 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 19, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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