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Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Headquarter's Buildings

 
 
Headquarter's Buildings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, December 27, 2016
1. Headquarter's Buildings Marker
Inscription. Adjutant's Office

The nerve center of Fort Lowell was the 56-by-56-foot adobe building. The post commander and post adjutant made their offices here. When the regimental commander and his staff were on post, they lived in the building. It contained a room for court-martials and a library with books, newspapers, and magazines for the soldiers.

Guardhouse

The guardhouse was a 50-by-50-foot adobe and stone building with rooms for the officer and sergeant of the guard, a general prisoner's room, a tool room, and 7 cells only 4 by 7 feet wide. In the rear were a 30-by-50-foot exercise yard and 2 privies.

The army enforced strict military discipline at Fort Lowell. The soldier's typical offenses included theft, desertion, absence without leave, insubordination, swearing, and drunkenness. Court-martials determined guilt and punishment. During the hottest months, the post commander occasionally tried to send prisoners to Alcatraz, off the California coast, because the Fort Lowell guardhouse was too crowded.

Quartermaster & Commissary Office

This administrative center was located in a 40 foot-by-60-foot building, now gone, the site buried under present-day Fort Lowell Road. Here the quartermaster and commissary officers, sergeants, and clerks directed the supplying
Headquarter's Buildings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, December 27, 2016
2. Headquarter's Buildings Marker
and feeding of the troops at Fort Lowell and across southern Arizona.

Bakery

Every soldier stationed at Fort Lowell received 22 ounces of bread as part of his daily ration. The baker produced the loaves at the post bakery, a 32-by-30-foot building with one oven. The baker was an enlisted man who received an extra 40 cents per day over and above his regular pay of $13 a month. He was excused from all other military duties.
 
Location. 32° 15.652′ N, 110° 52.498′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker is on North Craycroft Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2900 North Craycroft Road, Tucson AZ 85712, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rugged Pioneer Soldiers (a few steps from this marker); Quartermaster Depot and Post Trader (within shouting distance of this marker); The Chief Trumpeter (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fort Lowell Flagstaff (within shouting distance of this marker); Officers' Quarters (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Infantry Barracks / Laundresses' Quarters (about 400 feet away); Post Hospital (about 400 feet away); Veterans Memorial (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWars, US Indian
 
Photo displayed on marker. image. Click for full size.
circa 1889
3. Photo displayed on marker.
View of Parade ground looking southeast between 1889 and 1891.
Graphic displayed on marker. image. Click for full size.
December 27, 2016
4. Graphic displayed on marker.
Ft. Lowell 1885
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 31, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2016, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 380 times since then and 315 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 31, 2016, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.
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