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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crossing Lines

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Crossing Lines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
1. Crossing Lines Marker
Inscription. Across the street is the former 11th Precinct Police Station. In 1993 it became the Max Robinson Center for Health and Living, providing services for people with HIV/AIDS.

Whether by design or by accident, in 1910 the city built Anacostia's police station on the unofficial dividing line between the black and white residential sections. Until the 1960s residents rarely crossed the line, and children learned to stay where they belonged. "We [African Americans] had our world; we never really went outside it;' remembered neighborhood activist Rev. Oliver Johnson, so he "never felt discrimination" as a child.

Others saw it differently. Speaking of his youth in the 1940s, former Council member Stanley Anderson recalled in an interview with historian Dianne Dale that, "when you went below [the precinct house], white folks lived in there. And once you got down to Good Hope Road, you were in serious trouble .... You were constricted, so to speak, in those days." Even Anacostia Park was divided. African Americans stayed south of Good Hope Road, and whites used the north side, where the swimming pool and tennis courts were located.

Until 1909 when the 11th Precinct was established, Anacostia, Hillsdale, and other neighborhoods here were part of the 5th Precinct, headquartered across the river. The new precinct's
Crossing Lines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
2. Crossing Lines Marker
Spanish style building replaced a substation closer to Good Hope Road.

The Salvation Army's Solomon G. Brown Corps Community Center honors Hillsdale's Renaissance man. Although unschooled, Brown (ca. 1829-1906) became an expert on natural history during his 54 years at the Smithsonian and lectured frequently before scientific societies. Brown also founded several civic organizations and. in 1871 was elected to represent Anacostia and Hillsdale. in DC's short-lived territorial government.
 
Erected by Anacostia Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 10.)
 
Location. 38° 51.81′ N, 76° 59.444′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2234 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Museum for the Community (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Big Chair (about 800 feet away); The World’s Largest Chair (about 800 feet away); a different marker also named The Big Chair (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nichols Avenue Elementary School/Old Birney School Site
Max Robinson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
3. Max Robinson
Max Robinson Center was named for the nations first black TV news anchor (1939-1988) seen here at right editing a story for WRC-TV in 1967.
Close-up of photo on marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Birney School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mother Churches and Their Daughters (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Navy Town (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. African AmericansCharity & Public Work
 
The 11th Precinct Police Station image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
4. The 11th Precinct Police Station
The 11th Precinct police station, photographed around 1920 opened onto Chicago St.
Close-up of photo on reverse of marker
The Max Robinson Center for Health and Living image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
5. The Max Robinson Center for Health and Living
Pvt. Addison Davis of the 11th Precinct serves at a party for Neighborhood Children, 1965 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
6. Pvt. Addison Davis of the 11th Precinct serves at a party for Neighborhood Children, 1965
Close-up of photo on marker
Solomon Brown image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
7. Solomon Brown
Solomon Brown who lived on Elvans Rd. near Stanton Rd.
Close-up of photo on marker
“There is a screw loosed”<br>Solomon Brown's Letter<br>Sept. 4th 1862 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
8. “There is a screw loosed”
Solomon Brown's Letter
Sept. 4th 1862

Smithsonian Institution
Washington Sept 4th 1862


Prof Baird

Dear Sir

Our city is again thought to be in great danger. Every body seems much frightened the Enemy is said by some this morning to have appeared in Maryland – if this be true I don't see why they cannot come to Washington. in view of which I write to know if it would not be well to have your Silver got Ready for Sending on to you at Carlisles. Please write soon and let me know. I feel as usual quite well but yet I begin to fear our Generals is not alright, Some how or there is a screw loosed.

Respectfully yours,

S.G.Brown

P.S. We can do but little work here we have no [?] for every place and streets is filled with the Poor cut up men.
Close-up of photo on marker
Salvation Army<br>Solomon G Brown Corps Community Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
9. Salvation Army
Solomon G Brown Corps Community Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 6, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 381 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 6, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 9, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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