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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mother Churches and Their Daughters

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Mother Churches and Their Daughters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
1. Mother Churches and Their Daughters Marker
Inscription. Across This Intersection is St. Teresa of Avila, the first Catholic Church east of the Anacostia River. It is called the “mother church” because many area congregations are its offshoots.

As Uniontown grew, so did its Catholic population. In 1879 James Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop of Baltimore, established St. Teresa's Parish. Although racially mixed, St. Teresa's relegated its African American members to the back of the church they had helped build. In 1911 the black parishioners petitioned Cardinal Gibbons for a new parish to serve their needs. While fundraising to build a church of their own, parishioners met in homes and St. Teresa's basement. In 1918 Cardinal Gibbons granted their petition. The parish men volunteered nights and weekends to build the new Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church on Morris Road near Fort Stanton. It opened in 1921.

For decades black and white Catholics here led separate existences. Nancy Puglisi, a white elementary student at St. Teresa's School during the early 1950s, remembers going with her class to Our Lady of Perpetual Help's annual bazaar. "We'd be told to bring a quarter to buy something. Other than that, blacks and whites never socialized" By the 1970s, with the neighborhood's racial change, St. Teresa's was predominantly black, too.

Our Lady of Perpetual

Mother Churches and Their Daughters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
2. Mother Churches and Their Daughters Marker
Help is famous for the views from its Panorama Room, which has hosted everything from church bazaars to cabarets and Go-Go concerts.

The row of eight frame Italianate houses behind you was built in 1889 by brothers William and James Yost. The stone church on this corner originally housed Emmanuel Episcopal Church, the mother church to St. Philip the Evangelist.
 
Erected by Anacostia Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 19.)
 
Location. 38° 51.91′ N, 76° 59.253′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 13th Street Southeast, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2116 13th Street Southeast, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Big Chair (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Big Chair (about 600 feet away); The World’s Largest Chair (about 600 feet away); Uniontown, DC's First Suburb (about 600 feet away); The Sage of Anacostia (about 700 feet away); Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Booth's Escape (approx. 0.2 miles away); Crossing Lines (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
St. Teresa's choir makes a joyful noise, 1984 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
3. St. Teresa's choir makes a joyful noise, 1984
Close-up of photo on marker
8th Grade Graduation, 1956 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
4. 8th Grade Graduation, 1956
The eighth grade graduating class of St. Teresa's School, 1956 . In 1972 the school became part of Our Lady of Perpetual Help School.
Close-up of photo on marker
Queen of the May, 1960 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
5. Queen of the May, 1960
Nancy Puglisi, the 1960 May Queen of St. Teresa's, crowns the Virgin Mary.
St. Teresa of Avila Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
6. St. Teresa of Avila Church
Rev. Franz Schneeweiss & parishioners image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
7. Rev. Franz Schneeweiss & parishioners
Rev. Franz Schneeweiss, Our Lady of Perpetual Help's first pastor, and parishioners, about 1930.
Close-up of photo on marker
Confirmation Class image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
8. Confirmation Class
An Our Lady of Perpetual Help confirmation class, around 1948.
Close-up of photo on marker
Go-Go image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
9. Go-Go
Go-Go (with Southeast DC roots) at the Panorama Room: Rare Essence and Experience Unlimited, 1987.
Close-up of image on marker
St. Teresa of Avila Roman Catholic Parish -- Established 1879 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
10. St. Teresa of Avila Roman Catholic Parish -- Established 1879
Cornerstone - St. Teresa of Avila Church<br>1879 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
11. Cornerstone - St. Teresa of Avila Church
1879
The Priest's House<br>St. Teresa of Avila image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
12. The Priest's House
St. Teresa of Avila
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 8, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 210 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 8, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 10, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11, 12. submitted on January 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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