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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Faith and Action

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Faith and Action Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
1. Faith and Action Marker
Inscription. Settled by the formerly enslaved. Some Barry Farm-era churches still serve the neighborhood.

Macedonia Baptist Church, about a block to your left at 2625 Stanton Road, was organized in 1866 by Rev. James William Howard. Ten years later a group led by Rev. Henry Scott left Macedonia to form Bethlehem Baptist Church (across Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue).

Some early Barry Farm residents trekked the mile to the African Methodist Episcopal Allen Chapel, which since 1850 served the free black families of Good Hope village. Soon they formed what became Campbell AME Church, up the hill from this spot. During the 1950s, Campbell AME hosted groups working to desegregate schools in the District. Young church members Barbara and Adrienne Jennings were plaintiffs in Bolling v. Sharpe, one of the court cases folded into Brown v. Board of Education. In 1954 the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board and outlawed school segregation nationwide.

African American Episcopalians attended the Chapel of St. Philip the Evangelist, founded in 1887 as a mission of the nearby white Emmanuel Episcopal Church. St. Philip's 1937 building on Shannon Place was a gift from undertaker Minnie B. Smoot. Former City Council Chair Arrington Dixon recalled how St. Philip's Father Charles Walden gave him his first political awareness: "Father
Faith and Action Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
2. Faith and Action Marker
Walden would take us to the regional Episcopal Diocese youth meetings. They had discussion groups on all kinds of thoughtful things that kids should know."

Civic leader, lecturer, and poet Solomon Brown of Elvans Road founded Pioneer Sabbath School, where adults heard uplifting talks by such eminent speakers of the late 18005 as Frederick Douglass, Representative John Mercer Langston, and other members of Congress. Brown's school met weekly in Douglass Hall on the corner of Howard Road behind you. The United House of Prayer for All People, on Douglass Hall's former site, arrived in Anacostia in 1942, and on this spot in 1969.
 
Erected by Anacostia Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 2.)
 
Location. 38° 51.673′ N, 76° 59.649′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2511 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Navy Town (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Birney School (about 400 feet away); Barry Farm - Hillsdale (about 400 feet away);
Bethlehem Baptist Church<br>Photographed in 1951 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
3. Bethlehem Baptist Church
Photographed in 1951
Close-up of photo on marker
Nichols Avenue Elementary School/Old Birney School Site (about 400 feet away); A Museum for the Community (about 700 feet away); Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (about 700 feet away); Hillsdale (approx. 0.2 miles away); Crossing Lines (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
Bethlehem Baptist Church, 1903 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
4. Bethlehem Baptist Church, 1903
Bethlehem Baptist Church is visible in this 1903 view of Nichols (Now Martin Luther King jr.) Avenue.
Close-up of photo on marker
Bethlehem Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
5. Bethlehem Baptist Church
This building replaced the earlier church in the late 50s.
Bethlehem Baptist Church Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
6. Bethlehem Baptist Church Cornerstone
Bethlehem
Baptist Church
Rebuilt
A. D. 1954
Organized by
Rev. Henry Scott
A. D. 1876
Minnie B. Smoot image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
7. Minnie B. Smoot
Minnie B. Smoot, left (photographed with Marea Roper) donated the Shannon Pl. Chapel of St. Philip the Evangelist.
Close-up of photo on marker
St. Philip The Evangelist image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
8. St. Philip The Evangelist
The Church moved to 14th and U Sts. in 1977.
Close-up of photo on marker
Reverend S. Everette Guiles & Anne Guiles image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
9. Reverend S. Everette Guiles & Anne Guiles
Reverend S. Everette Guiles, photographed with his wife Anne, led Campbell AME Church during the school desegregation battle.
The Jennings Sisters, 1948 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
10. The Jennings Sisters, 1948
Bolling v. Sharpe plaintiffs Adrienne (left) and Barbara Jennings, photographed in 1948.
Close up of photos on marker
Arrington Dixon image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
11. Arrington Dixon
City Council Member Arrington Dixon testified on infant mortality in 1980.
Close-up of photo on marker
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
12. Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 156 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 17, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11, 12. submitted on January 24, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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