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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Green Bay in Brown County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Howard Stockade

 
 
Fort Howard Stockade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber
1. Fort Howard Stockade Marker
Inscription.
853 feet north 45 degrees, 7 minutes east, from this tablet, stands a flag pole, marking the southeast corner of the stockade of Fort Howard; occupied by United States troops August 1816, and almost continuously until 1852. On this site also stood the French fort, St. Francis, built prior to 1718, and rebuilt by the British in 1761, as Fort Edward Augustus.
 
Erected 1909 by Green Bay Historical Society.
 
Location. 44° 31.122′ N, 88° 1.033′ W. Marker is in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in Brown County. Marker is on Dousman Street (Business Route 29) 0.2 miles from North Broadway, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Green Bay WI 54303, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. September 11, 2001 Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Zachary Taylor (within shouting distance of this marker); Packers Heritage Trail (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alexis De Tocqueville (about 300 feet away); Chicago & North Western Depot (about 400 feet away); Downtown Green Bay
Fort Howard Stockade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber
2. Fort Howard Stockade Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); The Fort Howard Story (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Green Bay Road (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Green Bay.
 
Also see . . .  History of Green Bay. In 1816 Americans built Fort Howard. Some buildings have been restored and moved to Heritage Hill, a Wisconsin State Museum. (Submitted on January 1, 2011, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, Castles
 
Fort Howard Stockade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber, June 9, 2011
3. Fort Howard Stockade Marker
Stockade Marker, Packer Statue and Titletown Brewery in background image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber, June 9, 2011
4. Stockade Marker, Packer Statue and Titletown Brewery in background
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Depot/Titletown Brewery next to Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber
5. Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Depot/Titletown Brewery next to Marker
In 1893 Green Bay became the headquarters of the Lake Shore Division of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway. This action resulted in expansion of the facilities at Green Bay. In 1897 the C&NW purchased land on the northwest edge of Green Bay to build a new freight yard. A new depot was to be located on the site of the old freight yard and engine house, which was the former site of the Fort Howard Military Reservation. The new yard was completed in early 1898, thereby making possible the removal of the old yard in preparation for the construction of the depot. Charles S. Frost, a Chicago architect, designed the new depot. Mr. Frost designed most of the principle C&NW depots. Construction began in the fall of 1898 and the depot was opened to the public on July 29,1899. The building consisted of two stories. The first level housed the waiting rooms, lunchroom and ticket office. The upstairs level consisted of the agent's private office and a clubroom for employees of the C&NW Railway. The ladies' waiting room was tinted in green, and north of this was a lunchroom. The gentlemen's waiting room was finished in oak with the walls being in Venetian red. An 11' wide entrance connected the carriage way, waiting rooms and ticket office.
Green Bay Packer Statue next to Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber
6. Green Bay Packer Statue next to Marker
An action-posed Green Bay Packer Receiver statue stands in front of the Titletown Brewery. The 22-ft. tall fiberglass football player statue, leaping from the top of a large football to catch a pass, has moved around town a bit. He stood at the Packer Hall of Fame until 2003 when the Hall was absorbed into the stadium. Then the receiver persevered in front of the Neville Public Museum, until he was displaced in 2005 by something apparently more important, a replica World Trade Center 9/11 memorial.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 18, 2010, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona. This page has been viewed 1,398 times since then and 95 times this year. Last updated on January 19, 2017, by Daniel E Hunt of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 18, 2010, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona.   3, 4. submitted on June 9, 2011, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona.   5, 6. submitted on December 18, 2010, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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