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Near Vinemont in Cullman County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Streight’s Raid

A Failed Campaign

 
 
Streight’s Raid — A Failed Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 28, 2017
1. Streight’s Raid — A Failed Campaign Marker
Inscription.
"The thanks of Congress are again due to General N. B. Forrest and the officers and men of his command, for meritorious service in the field, and especially for the daring, skill, and perseverance exhibited in the pursuit and capture of the largely superior forces of the enemy, near Rome, Ga., in May last.”
— Confederate Congressional Resolution

"Our ammunition was worthless, our horses and mules in a desperate condition, the men were overcome with fatigue and loss of sleep, and we were confronted by fully three times our number, in the heart of the enemy's country, and, although personally opposed to surrender, I yielded…” — Colonel Abel D. Streight, USA

In April 1863, Union forces in the West were stalled and Confederate attacks on Union supply lines flourished. In hopes of returning the favor and to divert Confederate attention, Union cavalry raided Confederate territory at several points. One of these raids coursed through northern Alabama and onto the ground before you. Colonel Abel D. Streight commanded this provisional brigade of Union raiders the—51st and 73rd Indiana, 3rd Ohio, and 18th Illinois regiments and two companies of the 1st Alabama Union Cavalry.
Streight's force consisted of 1,800
View of marker looking towards area of action near Hog Mountain. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 28, 2017
2. View of marker looking towards area of action near Hog Mountain.
men, mostly mounted on mules instead of horses. They set out from Eastport, Mississippi, on April 19, 1863, with the goal of disrupting Confederate supply routes near Rome, Georgia — more than 200 miles away. Streight's advance was discovered and Confederate troops under General Nathan Bedford Forrest commenced pursuit on April 28. Forrest caught up with Streight's rearguard and the forces clashed at Day's Gap on Sand Mountain on the morning of April 30. Streight captured two Confederate cannons and a "running battle" continued all day. As darkness fell, Streight took up a strong position on Hog Mountain, in front of you. After fighting here, Forrest pursued Streight for another 110 miles.
On May 3, his men exhausted, his mules in a "desperate condition" and thinking himself outnumbered, Streight surrendered his command of some 1,500 men to Forrest's less than 500, only 20 miles from his goal of Rome, Georgia.

Photo captions
[Under Map] - After the running battle on April 30, Streight's troubles were far from over. Forrest pursued relentlessly, almost to the Georgia border. Forrest's feat of compelling the surrender of a Union force three times the size of his is without parallel in the Civil War.

[Under photos] - Colonel Abel D. Streight surrendered his entire force just days after
General Nathan Bedford Forrest (C.S.A.) / Colonel Abel Delos Streight (U.S.A.) image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain
3. General Nathan Bedford Forrest (C.S.A.) / Colonel Abel Delos Streight (U.S.A.)
the Battle of Hog Mountain but the following winter he was among the scores of Union officers who tunneled their way out of Libby Prison. He returned to active duty. Courtesy Library of Congress

General Nathan Bedford Forrest's pursuit of Col. Streight was coupled with a series of bluffs and ruses which ultimately made Streight think he was outnumbered and outgunned. When Streight found how few men had compelled his surrender, Forrest reportedly said, "Aw, Colonel, everything's fair in love and war." Courtesy Library of Congress

 
Erected 2013 by the Civil War Trust.
 
Location. 34° 12.774′ N, 86° 57.506′ W. Marker is near Vinemont, Alabama, in Cullman County. Marker is on County Road 1136 0.4 miles north of 1145, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is west of Interstate 65, north of U.S. Highway 278 and south of the town of West Point. Marker is in this post office area: Vinemont AL 35179, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Streight’s Raid (here, next to this marker); Battle of Hog Mountain (approx. 1.3 miles away); Land-Use and Water Quality
Crooked Creek Civil War Museum and battlefield nearby this marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 28, 2017
4. Crooked Creek Civil War Museum and battlefield nearby this marker.
Located about 2.4 miles northwest on Cullman County Road 1127. Contains numerous Civil War artifacts (local and period), some of which can be handled.
(approx. 1.9 miles away); Clarkson Covered Bridge (approx. 1.9 miles away); Alabama's Physical Diversity (approx. 1.9 miles away); What’s the Big Deal about Litter?! (approx. 1.9 miles away); Alabama's Aquatic Biodiversity (approx. 1.9 miles away); What happens to my wastewater? (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Trust unveils interpretive markers - Press Release. (Submitted on January 28, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. The Encyclopedia of Alabama Streight's Raid. (Submitted on January 30, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, US Civil
 
One of many marker noting the route of the area actions. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 28, 2017
5. One of many marker noting the route of the area actions.
Marker (closest) with view of Cullman County water tower and County Road 1136. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 28, 2017
6. Marker (closest) with view of Cullman County water tower and County Road 1136.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 3, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 28, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 301 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 28, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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