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Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Texas Confederate Woman's Home

 
 
Texas Confederate Woman's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, January 29, 2017
1. Texas Confederate Woman's Home Marker
Inscription. The Texas Confederate Woman’s home opened in 1908 and provided a home for over three thousand wives and widows of Confederate Veterans. Potential residents were wives or widows of honorably discharged Confederate soldiers, women who could prove active participation in the Confederate War effort, and women 60 years or older without a means of support.

The Confederate Men’s Home began in Austin in 1884 and the Albert Sidney Johnston Chapter #105 of the Texas Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) made visits, brought gifts, food and clothing to the veterans. Under the leadership of President Katie Daffan, the Texas UDC began coordination and fundraising to secure a home for needy Confederate wives and widows. Through dinners, events, concerts and individual donations, the Texas UDC purchased property and constructed a Richardson Romanesque Revival style structure. In addition to several bedrooms and bathrooms, the home featured a parlor, dining area and a hospital. UDC chapters from all over the state donated furnishings for the home.

Due to the cost to maintain the home, the UDC transferred the home to the state of Texas on Dec. 23, 1911. An annex was built that doubled the size and increased the capacity, and a hospital was erected in 1916. The state legislature established the Board of Control
State Antiquities Landmark and Austin Landmark plaques image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, January 29, 2017
2. State Antiquities Landmark and Austin Landmark plaques
to operate the home in 1920, and then in 1949, responsibility transferred to the Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools. This home provided for more than 3,400 indigent wives and widows of Confederate veterans and operated until 1963, when the last residents were transferred to private nursing homes.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17561.)
 
Location. 30° 18.06′ N, 97° 44.093′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of Cedar Street and West 38th Street, on the left when traveling north on Cedar Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in front of the building which now serves as the AGE of Central Texas. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3710 Cedar Street, Austin TX 78705, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Shipe House (approx. ¼ mile away); Buddington-Benedict-Sheffield Compound (approx. ¼ mile away); Philquist-Wood House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Penn and Nellie Wooldridge House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Elvira T. Manor Davis House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stanley and Emily Finch House
Texas Confederate Woman's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, January 29, 2017
3. Texas Confederate Woman's Home Marker
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Jane Yelvington McCallum (approx. 0.4 miles away); Williams-Weigl House (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Confederate Men's Home
 
Also see . . .  Handbook of Texas article. The Confederate Woman's Home was opened in 1908 to care for widows and wives of honorably discharged Confederate soldiers and other women who aided the Confederacy. (Submitted on January 29, 2017, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkWar, US CivilWomen
 
Texas Confederate Woman's Home image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
4. Texas Confederate Woman's Home
Old postcard dated 1909 showing the home as it was. See http://www.austinpostcard.com/view.php?card=23585
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 29, 2017, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 136 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 29, 2017, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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