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Fort Indiantown Gap in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

M2/M59 Howitzer

 
 
M2/M59 Howitzer Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
1. M2/M59 Howitzer Marker
Inscription.

This M52 (155mm) Towed Howitzer was the standard heavy field gun for the United [S]tates during World War II. During World War I the United States was poorly equipped with heavy artillery. To address this issue, the U.S. Army developed several prototypes in the 1920s and 1930s. However, due to lack of government funding, it was not until 1938 that the M1 was adopted for military service. After several changes, the M2 version seen here (serial NO.3217) saw widespread action in both the European and Pacific theater[s] of operations. It served or was attached to each division during World War II and during the war the howitzer received the nickname "Long Tom". It also came in an 8-inch (203mm) version which had a heavier barrel.

The howitzer is a general purpose field artillery weapon used to provide indirect fire support to ground units. It could fire forty rounds per hour at the maximum rate. After World War II the U.S. Army re-organized and the gun was re-designated as the M59 in the military inventory. The M59 saw service both in Korea and Vietnam. Its primary mission during post WWII era was to serve in various corps level and division artillery units known as DIVARTY. This artillery piece served with the Pennsylvania Army National Guard's 28th DIVARTY unit based in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Entered Service: 1938 (M1), 1941

M2/M59 Howitzer and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
2. M2/M59 Howitzer and Marker
(M1A1), 1945 (M2)
Manufacturer: Rock Island Arsenal & other arsenals
Weight 30,600 pounds
Length: 13.71 Meters (44.98 feet)
Width: 2.43 Meters (7.97 feet)
Height: 3.04 Meters (9.97 feet)
Crew: 14-15
Firing Range: 23,700 Meters (14.7 miles)
Weapon System: It has no defensive weapons except for the crew's individual assigned weapons.
 
Erected by Pennsylvania National Guard Military Museum.
 
Location. 40° 25.945′ N, 76° 34.204′ W. Marker is in Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, in Lebanon County. Marker is at the intersection of Fisher Avenue and Clement Avenue/Wiley Road, on the left when traveling east on Fisher Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Annville PA 17003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. M915A1 Line Haul Tractor (a few steps from this marker); M578 LRV (a few steps from this marker); M42 Duster (within shouting distance of this marker); Saint-Avold Tribute to 3rd American Army (within shouting distance of this marker); M110 Howitzer (within shouting distance of this marker); 40 & 8 Boxcar (within
M2/M59 Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
3. M2/M59 Howitzer
shouting distance of this marker); Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge (within shouting distance of this marker); 95th Infantry Division Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Indiantown Gap.
 
Also see . . .
1. M59 (M2 Long Tom) 155mm Towed Field Gun. (Submitted on February 2, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. US troops set up 155mm Gun (Long Tom) on YouTube. (Submitted on February 2, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Pennsylvania National Guard Military Museum. (Submitted on February 2, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. War, ColdWar, KoreanWar, VietnamWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 267 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 2, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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