Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument

Reconciling History

 

—Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —

 
Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 26, 2017
1. Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, approximately 60,000 Marylanders fought for the Union and 25,000 fought for the Confederacy. After the war, Confederate sympathizers erected monuments such as this one to recognize Confederate soldiers and sailors and to illustrate the beliefs of “the Lost Cause” which began shortly after the Civil War to promote the views of Confederate sympathizers about the causes and events of the Civil War.

Funded by the Maryland Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy, the monument depicts the allegorical figure of Glory holding a dying Confederate soldier in one arm, and raising the laurel crown of Victory in the other. The soldier clutches his heart with one hand and a Confederate battle flag with the other. Sculptor F. Wellington Ruckstuhl stated that he intended for Glory to uplift the dying soldier from oblivion and glorify his cause “in ages to come.” Gloria Victis means “Glory to the Vanquished.” Deo Vindice, translated as “God Our Vindicator,” was the Confederate motto.

Monuments like this one helped to perpetuate Lost Cause tenets, which portrayed slavery as benign, secession as justified, and advocated for while supremacy. In the same period that this monument was installed, Baltimore City adopted racial segregation housing ordinances and deed covenants,

Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 26, 2017
2. Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker
supported segregation policies in public spaces and programs, and unequally funded African American school budgets, infrastructure improvements, and public programs.

In 2015, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake appointed a Special Commission to Review Baltimore’s Public Confederate Monuments to provide recommendations based on informed decisions and citizen input on how to address Baltimore’s monuments that honor the Confederacy and the Lost Cause Movement. This commission concluded that this monument was part of a propaganda campaign of national pro-Confederate organizations to perpetuate the beliefs of white supremacy, falsify history, and support segregation and racial intimidation.

This plaque serves to inform the public on the history of Baltimore’s Confederate monuments. For more information, please review the Special Commission to Review Baltimore’s Public Confederate Monuments Report to Mayor Rawlings-Blake located at w.w.w.chap.baltimorecity.gov.

Sign content developed by the Baltimore City Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation. Graphic design services provided by the Baltimore National Heritage Area.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 39° 18.528′ N, 76° 37.35′ W. Marker was in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker was on Mount

Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 26, 2017
3. Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Royal Avenue. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21217, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Garry Moore (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jesse Lazear, M.D. (about 700 feet away); Florence Rena Sabin, M.D. (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Edwards Stevenson (approx. 0.2 miles away); F. Scott Fitzgerald (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edith Hamilton (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mergenthaler House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ernest Stebbins, M.D. (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker-Base only image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 19, 2017
4. Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument Marker-Base only
The statue was removed by the City of Baltimore on August 16, 2017 because if was deemed offensive to the public
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 5, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 135 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 5, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on August 20, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement