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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Princeton Township in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

From Trenton to Princeton

 
 
From Trenton to Princeton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, January 1, 2012
1. From Trenton to Princeton Marker
Inscription. Following the Christmas night crossing of the Delaware River and the First Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, George Washington’s army re-crossed the river back into Pennsylvania. The British and German troops reacted to their defeat at Trenton by abandoning posts at Mount Holly and Burlington and moving to Princeton. Taking advantage of the British confusion, Washington moved his whole force back to Trenton over the next week, assembling nearly 6,000 soldiers by January 2, 1777.

With British strength at Princeton now at nearly 8,000, Charles Cornwallis moved to attack Trenton on January 2. A strong American force under Colonel Edward Hand in Maidenhead (now Lawrenceville) began a running battle, slowly giving ground back into Trenton. Darkness ended this Second Battle of Trenton and found the town divided between British and American forces. With his back to the Delaware River, Washington used information from the Cadwalader spy map to make a withdrawal east and around the British troops in Trenton and Maidenhead. Under strict silence, tired American soldiers marched through the night, arriving here on the Clarke family farms shortly after dawn on January 3rd.
 
Erected by State of New Jersey, Division of Parks and Forestry.
 
Location.
From Trenton to Princeton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
2. From Trenton to Princeton Marker
40° 19.74′ N, 74° 40.512′ W. Marker is in Princeton Township, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Touch for map. This marker is near a service road in the Princeton Battlefield State Park, between the parking area and the Thomas Clarke House. Marker is in this post office area: Princeton NJ 08540, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas Clarke House (here, next to this marker); General Hugh Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); The British Occupation of New Jersey (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Moulder’s Battery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to the Institute Lands (about 500 feet away); Route of Washington’s March (about 600 feet away); Stony Brook Meeting House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Richard Stockton (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Princeton Township.
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Plan of Operations of General Washington image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
3. Plan of Operations of General Washington
against the Kings Troops in New Jersey, from the 26th of December 1776, to the 3rd January 1777, William Faden, London 1777 Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
Spy map of back road to Princeton, requested by Colonel John Cadwalader. image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
4. Spy map of back road to Princeton, requested by Colonel John Cadwalader.
Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
Marker on the Princeton Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 6, 2013
5. Marker on the Princeton Battlefield
A Revolutionary War encampment can be seen behind the marker.
Marker on the Princeton Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, January 1, 2013
6. Marker on the Princeton Battlefield
From Trenton to Princeton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, August 2008
7. From Trenton to Princeton Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2008, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,276 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 2, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 12, 2008, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   5. submitted on April 6, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on January 2, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on August 12, 2008, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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