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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Inverness in Citrus County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

A Costly Florida War

 
 
A Costly Florida War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
1. A Costly Florida War Marker
Inscription.
More than 1,500 soldiers died and $20 million was spent in the Second Seminole War. It was the most costly of three conflicts between the U.S. and the Seminoles in Florida. Fought from 1835–1842, the war broke out when Seminoles resisted government attempts to relocate them to Oklahoma, under the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

Skirmish at Fort Cooper
In the spring of 1836, Citrus County was the site of a two-pronged attack against the resistant Seminoles. Led by General Winfield Scott, a force of 380 soldiers employed maneuvers designed to trap the Seminoles near the Cove of the Withlacoochee.

A large number of soldiers were wounded or became sick. Major Mark Anthony Cooper was left behind to hold the position. Five companies of the Macon Volunteers and a small artillery company were under his command. They built a sizable fort of pine logs—later named in Cooper’s honor—on a low bluff overlooking Lake Holathlikaha. From this encampment, the soldiers defended themselves against attacks by Chief Osceola and his warriors. Later in the war, the fort was used as a reconnaissance, observation and dispatch post.

Digging Up the Past An excavation of the Fort Cooper site in 1971 unearthed old pickets, hand-forged nails, musket balls, a tin cup, a soldier’s
Digging Up the Past (<b><i>marker detail</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
2. Digging Up the Past (marker detail)
grave, and bone fragments from the war. Pot sherds and prehistoric arrow points revealed an even earlier history.
 
Erected by Rails to Trails of the Withlacoochee.
 
Location. 28° 48.247′ N, 82° 18.635′ W. Marker is in Inverness, Florida, in Citrus County. Marker can be reached from South Florida Avenue (U.S. 41) half a mile north of East Fort Cooper Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Withlacoochee State Trail, a "Rails to Trails" bicycle trail, at the trail entrance to Fort Cooper State Park. The marker is accessible only by foot or bicycle. Marker is in this post office area: Inverness FL 34450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Cooper (approx. one mile away); World War I and World War II Memorial (approx. 2˝ miles away); Citrus County Veterans Memorial (approx. 2˝ miles away); Persian Gulf War Memorial (approx. 2˝ miles away); Korea and Viet Nam War Memorial (approx. 2˝ miles away); Korean War Memorial (approx. 2˝ miles away); Historic Citrus County Courthouse (approx. 2˝ miles away); Greater Mount Carmel Baptist Church (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Inverness.
 
Also see . . .
Macon Volunteers (<b><i>marker detail</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
3. Macon Volunteers (marker detail)

1. A battle from the Seminole War of 1836. Since the haphazardly employed tribal weapons lacked penetrating power the number of wounded soldiers far outnumbered those that were killed. However, in a campaign against the Seminoles a wounded man was potentially a greater loss to the army than a dead soldier. Casualties could not be left undefended in the crude hospital facilities because the Indians would attack the wounded men and their attendants. The presence of wounded frequently limited the army commander’s options and in many cases small outposts (like Fort Cooper near the Cove of the Withlacoochee) were constructed to shelter the sick and injured. (Submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mark Anthony Cooper (1800-1885). 1836 he entered the Second Seminole War as commander of a battalion of Georgia volunteers, distinguishing himself in an episode involving 3,000 pounds of bacon sent by Governor William Schley for Georgia troops (Major Cooper refused to surrender the bacon to federal authorities, reiterating his states' rights views). Fort Cooper, near Inverness, Florida, was named in his honor. (Submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Major Mark Anthony Cooper (<b><i>marker detail</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
4. Major Mark Anthony Cooper (marker detail)
Chief Osceola (<b><i>marker inset detail</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
5. Chief Osceola (marker inset detail)
A Costly Florida War Marker (<b><i>wide view</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, February 12, 2015
6. A Costly Florida War Marker (wide view)

Fort Cooper State Park entrance off of the Withlacoochee State Trail can be seen in the right background
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 148 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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