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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maxwell in Lincoln County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort McPherson

 
 
Fort McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 3, 2013
1. Fort McPherson Marker
Inscription.
The fort was established on the Oregon Trail on the south side of the Platte River in October 1863, on the eve of intensified Indian raids on the Plains. Built next to the well-known Cottonwood Springs and McDonald ranch, it commanded a strategic north-south Indian trail across the Platte valley.

First known as Cantonment McKean and then Fort Cottonwood, in February 1866 the fort was named for Major-General James B. McPherson. It served to protect the important Platte valley line of travel and communication and was the base for innumerable scouting parties and for field campaigns in 1865, 1866 and 1869. General Carr’s campaign in 1869 broke the power of the Cheyennes and cleared the surrounding area from more than temporary Indian threats.

The Russian prince Alexis prepared here for his famous buffalo hunt in 1871. General Custer, Buffalo Bill, the North Brothers and their Pawnee scouts were often at the Fort.

The fort was abandoned in 1880, but a portion of the military reservation is now the Fort McPherson National Cemetery where rest soldiers from McPherson and other frontier forts.
 
Erected by Lincoln County Historical Society and Historical Land Mark Council. (Marker Number 14.)
 
Marker series.
Fort McPherson Marker (<b><i>wide view</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 3, 2013
2. Fort McPherson Marker (wide view)
This marker is included in the Nebraska State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 41° 5.034′ N, 100° 32.209′ W. Marker is in Maxwell, Nebraska, in Lincoln County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 30 and South Jackson Road, on the left when traveling east on U.S. 30. Touch for map. Marker is located within a pullout off South Jackson Road near the intersection with US Highway 30. Marker is in this post office area: Maxwell NE 69151, United States of America.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort McPherson National Cemetery.
Built in 1863, Fort McPherson was established to ensure peace along the western frontier between the immigrants traveling along the Oregon Trail and the Native American inhabitants. The troops originally stationed at the post provided military protection from hostile Native Americans during the construction of the railroad. (Submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fort McPherson.
Fort McPherson National Cemetery is a reflection of the people and their ancestors who settled in the American West. Through the valley passed traders and trappers in their search for furs, settlers in their quest for land and freedom, miners seeking the riches of the Rocky Mountains and the first transcontinental railroad linking the East and West Coast. The fort provided protection for the building of a railroad and for settlers
Fort McPherson Marker (<b><i>pullout</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 3, 2013
3. Fort McPherson Marker (pullout)

View from marker of South Jackson Road pullout and US Highway 30 leading to the small town of Maxwell in the background. The former military reservation and current Fort McPherson National Cemetery (referenced on the marker) are located on the other (i.e., east) side of Maxwell.
in their western trek. (Submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 200 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 7, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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