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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Triple-Expansion Steam Engine

 
 
Triple-Expansion Steam Engine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
1. Triple-Expansion Steam Engine Marker
Inscription. Before you is a 30 ton triple-expansion engine from the steam schooner Wapama, This is the larges artifact rescued from the vessel before it demolition. Inside the visitors center across the street are extensive exhibits and films. There you can see a model of the ship, Wapama's cast iron propeller, and learn more about California's lumber trade.

VESSEL SPECIFICATIONS:
Propulsion - Single propeller, two oil-fired water-tube boilers, 800hp, speed of 10 knots.
Length: 26 feet
Beam: 41 feet
Depth: 16 feet

(Side bar on right)
Wapama was the last of some 225 steam schooners that transported lumber from the Pacific Northwest to California ports. These large wooden vessels replaced sailing schooners like C.A. Thayer (seen further down the pier) and they provided passenger service to the smaller lumber ports like Eureka and Mendocino.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 37° 48.478′ N, 122° 25.255′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from Hyde Street near Jefferson Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2950 Hyde Street, San Francisco CA 94109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Triple-Expansion Steam Engine and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
2. Triple-Expansion Steam Engine and Marker
Note: the engine is covered.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. San Francisco Bay "Ark" (a few steps from this marker); Steam Donkey Engine (a few steps from this marker); The South End Rowing Club (within shouting distance of this marker); Hyde Street Pier (within shouting distance of this marker); Sanitation at Sea (within shouting distance of this marker); The Dolphin Swimming and Boating Club (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tubbs Cordage Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tug Sea Fox (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The triple expansion engine is located on Hyde Street Pier just inside the entrance to San Francisco Maritime Nation Historical Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Marine Steam Engines - Wikipedia. Scroll to the bottom of the article.

A triple-expansion engine is a compound engine that expands the steam in three stages... Multiple-expansion engine manufacture continued well into the 20th century. All 2,700 Liberty ships built by the United States during World War II were powered by triple-expansion engines, because the capacity of the US to manufacture marine steam turbines was entirely directed to the building of warships. (Submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
The <i>Wapama's</i> Triple-Expansion Steam Engine and Marker image. Click for full size.
By National Park Service, September 6, 2013
3. The Wapama's Triple-Expansion Steam Engine and Marker
 

2. Triple-Expansion Marine Steam Engine (1910) In Slow Motion - YouTube. This video demonstrates a cutaway version of a triple expansion steam engine. (Submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

3. Hot and running... Triple expansion steam engine - SS Jeremiah O'Brien - YouTube. This video shows the operation of the liberty ship Jeremiah O'Brien's triple expansion steam engine. (Submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

4. Wapama (steam schooner). Wapama was a two-masted, 216.91-foot-long (66.11 m) wooden schooner with a 42.33-foot (12.90 m) beam and a depth of 19-foot (5.8 m), net tonnage of 524, but a gross tonnage of 945. The Wapama was constructed in by St. Helens Shipbuilding Company... The shipyard launched the incomplete Wapama, described as "little more than a finished hull", in a celebration on January 20, 1915. The ship was then towed to San Francisco... (Submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Cross-section of a Triple-Expansion Steam Engine image. Click for full size.
By Usf
4. Cross-section of a Triple-Expansion Steam Engine
The <i>Wapama</i> circa 1935 image. Click for full size.
By National Park Service
5. The Wapama circa 1935
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 119 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 9, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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