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Fort Shaw in Cascade County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Fort Shaw

 
 
Fort Shaw Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2013
1. Fort Shaw Marker
Inscription.
Barring fur trading posts, the first important white settlements in Montana were the mining camps in the western mountains. Everything to the east belonged to the plains Indians and was buffalo range. To protect the miners and settlers from possible incursions of hostile tribes a series of military posts was established around the eastern border of the mining camps and settlements. Fort Shaw established in 1867 was one of these. It also protected the stage and freight trail from Fort Benton, head of navigation on the Missouri, to the Last Chance Gulch placer diggings at Helena. Everything north of the Sun River was Blackfeet Indian territory at that time. The Fort was built by the 13th U.S. Infantry under Major Wm. Clinton.

General Gibbon led his troops from here in 1876 to join General Terry and General Custer on the Yellowstone just prior to the latter’s disastrous fight with the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at the Battle of the Little Big Horn.
 
Location. 47° 30.01′ N, 111° 49.137′ W. Marker is in Fort Shaw, Montana, in Cascade County. Marker is on State Highway 200 0.2 miles west of Dr Russell Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in a pullout on the north side of Montana Highway 200. Marker
Fort Shaw Marker (<b><i>wide view</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2013
2. Fort Shaw Marker (wide view)
is in this post office area: Fort Shaw MT 59443, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sun River Crossing (approx. 5˝ miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a plastic laminate placard hanging on a wooden frame.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Shaw History.
Established 30 Jun 1867 as a U.S. Army Infantry post (Camp Reynolds) by Major William Clinton and four companies of the 13th U.S. Infantry to prevent the movement of hostile Indians into settled areas and to protect the Fort Benton-Helena stage route. Renamed Fort Shaw 1 Aug 1867 after Colonel Robert G. Shaw, 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, who was killed 18 Jul 1863 during the U.S. Civil War. Abandoned in 1891 and transferred to the Interior Department in 1892. (Submitted on March 10, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fort Shaw.
Built in 1867 in what was then the heart of the country dominated by the Blackfoot Confederacy, Fort Shaw stood just a few miles west of where the Mullan Road [the important pre-Civil War federal military road through the region] crossed the Sun River. Colonel I.V.D. Reeves designed the fort, which was built with timber from nearby hills and sandstone and fieldstone found nearby. The soldiers also made
Fort Shaw Landscape (<b><i>view from Montana highway 200</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2013
3. Fort Shaw Landscape (view from Montana highway 200)
adobe bricks that were used to construct the walls of many buildings at the fort. You can still see [in 1986 and 2015 as well] several of the original buildings, including two sandstone washhouses for the officers, the officers’ living quarters, and the commanding officer’s house. (Submitted on March 10, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Fort Shaw Landscape (<b><i>view from Montana highway 200</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2013
4. Fort Shaw Landscape (view from Montana highway 200)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 13, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 259 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 10, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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