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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Simsbury in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

First House and Ferry

 
 
First House and Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, August 28, 2016
1. First House and Ferry Marker
Inscription.
Site of the first home in Simsbury
Captain Aaron Cook
circa 1660

Site of the Pent Road Ferry
circa 1668
The Traine Band passed here

 
Erected 1993 by the Terry’s Plain Homeowners Association.
 
Location. 41° 53.068′ N, 72° 47.053′ W. Marker is in Simsbury, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Ferry Lane and Goodrich Road, on the left when traveling north on Ferry Lane. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 36 Ferry Lane, Simsbury CT 06070, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Militia Training Ground (approx. 0.3 miles away); Constitution Oak (approx. 0.4 miles away); First School House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Simsbury (approx. 0.9 miles away); This Elm Tree (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Landmark Building (approx. 1.1 miles away); Simsbury Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Eno Memorial Hall (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Simsbury.
 
Regarding First House and Ferry.
Captain Aaron Cook built his home and developed the land around it. In 1677, he deeded the property to John
First House and Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, August 28, 2016
2. First House and Ferry Marker
The brownstone for this marker was from a nearby quarry.
Terry. This home, on the east side of the Farmington River, was the site of the first recorded Town Meeting on May 5, 1671. The meeting voted to establish the location of the future Meeting House on the west side of the river. Thomas Barber was commissioned to perform the construction for the 24 x 28 foot building at a cost of 33 pounds.

The road leading to the ferry crossing was fenced on both sides of the Farmington River so farmers could control their cattle on and off the ferry. Luke Hill served as the ferryman and was paid 12 pounds per year. In 1756 the General Assembly commissioned another ferry at Pent Road. The fee for a man, horse, and load was one penny. Cattle, sheep, and swine were one half penny per head.
 
Also see . . .
1. Terry’s Plain Historic District. (Submitted on March 18, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Terry’s Plain Historic District. (Submitted on March 18, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
The marker is at the end of Ferry Lane. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, August 28, 2016
3. The marker is at the end of Ferry Lane.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 20, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 18, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 18, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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