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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lubbock in Lubbock County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

A Tribute to Cotton

 
 
A Tribute to Cotton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
1. A Tribute to Cotton Marker
Inscription.
In the early 1900s, area pioneer farmers marketed bales of cotton on this site. Today, this cotton bale serves as a monument to those who made Lubbock County and the surrounding south plains the greatest producer of upland cotton in the world. In 1899, Lubbock County grew only 15 bales; by 1932 it was one of the state’s leading producers; by the 1950s Lubbock and other south plains counties produced half the state’s production. In 1977 Lubbock County grew a record 346,000 bales.

Irrigation technology, improved cotton breeds, and area innovations made high production possible. Farmers and scientists produced stormproof and machine-harvestable varieties through the Texas A & M experiment station in north Lubbock County. Texas Tech’s textile research center adapted methods for textile mills to use south plains cotton. Instrument classing and electronic marketing techniques also were developed in the region.

The city of Lubbock became the center for the south plains cotton industry with warehouses, a cotton exchange and 5 cottonseed oil mills.
 
Erected 1986 by J.D. Hufstedler Family & Lubbock County Commissioners' Court.
 
Location. 33° 35.108′ N, 101° 50.715′ W. Marker is in Lubbock, Texas
A Tribute to Cotton Dedication Placard (<b><i>back side of monument</i></b>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
2. A Tribute to Cotton Dedication Placard (back side of monument)
, in Lubbock County. Marker is at the intersection of Texas Avenue and Main Street, on the left when traveling south on Texas Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is located at the base of a metal cotton bale replica monument, just outside the main entrance on the west side of the Lubbock County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Lubbock TX 79401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War (here, next to this marker); Mackenzie Scout Trail (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Methodist Church of Lubbock (approx. 0.3 miles away); F W & D South Plains Railway Depot (approx. half a mile away); Buddy Holly (approx. half a mile away); J.I. Allison House circa 1950s (approx. half a mile away); Bacon Home (approx. 0.7 miles away); Yellowhouse Canyon (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lubbock.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lubbock County.
By the 1930s cotton culture had begun its rise to become the dominant agricultural enterprise in Lubbock County, although other crops were still produced. By 1981 the county ranked third in the state, with 274,669 bales ginned by its thirty-three gins (first in the state). The county also had three cottonseed oil mills; Lubbock is recognized as the world's leading producer of cottonseed oil. (Submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
A Tribute to Cotton Marker (<b><i>wide view; Lubbock County Courthouse behind</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
3. A Tribute to Cotton Marker (wide view; Lubbock County Courthouse behind)
 

2. The Legacy of ‘King Cotton'.
Texas was one of the top cotton-producing states in the nation before the Civil War. Today, the state’s farms churn out millions of cotton bales annually — from 3.5 million in 2011 during the depths of the state’s drought to a record-setting 8.4 million bales in 2005. (Submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Lubbock History.
In 1902, there were only four bales of cotton in the entire county. In 1919, the number of bales had risen to 13,865, and by 1932, an incredible 100,000 bales had been grown. Currently, Lubbock County has been able to produce between two and three million bales of cotton annually! (Submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceScience & Medicine
 
A Tribute to Cotton Marker (<b><i>tall view; Lubbock County Courthouse behind</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
4. A Tribute to Cotton Marker (tall view; Lubbock County Courthouse behind)
A Tribute to Cotton Marker (<b><i>back view; dedication placard at bottom</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
5. A Tribute to Cotton Marker (back view; dedication placard at bottom)
Lubbock County Courthouse (<b><i>Monument & Marker visible right of sidewalk</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
6. Lubbock County Courthouse (Monument & Marker visible right of sidewalk)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 87 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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