Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Barkhamsted in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Austin Hawes Memorial Campground

Farmington River: Wild & Scenic

 
 
Austin Hawes Memorial Campground Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 29, 2016
1. Austin Hawes Memorial Campground Marker
Inscription.
In this Area in the Past.....

The Austin Hawes Memorial Campground is located in an area once known as the “Greenwoods,” where until the late 1700s large pine and hemlock trees grew along the Farmington River. From 1800 to 1942 this was agricultural land. Starting in 1934 the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) used portions of it for athletic fields. When the CCC Camp White closed in 1942, pines began growing up again in the area.

The Austin Hawes Campground, built in 1969, was named after Austin Hawes. Hawes, who served intermittently as Connecticut State Forester for 27 years between 1904 and 1943, helped to guide the development of Connecticut State Forests and the management of woodlands throughout the state.

The Civilian Conservation Corps Camp White, 1934 to 1942 was located at the site of the current Youth Group Camping Area in American Legion. The stone chimney still stands today.

Camp White was located upriver from the campground, on the west side of the road. During the Great Depression 250 men lived in the camp. They planted trees, helped to control forest fires, and build roads, trails and the Stone Museum in Peoples State Forest.

Youngsdale Mill was located downriver from the campground, on the riverbank below the Forestry Office and
Austin Hawes Memorial Campground image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 29, 2016
2. Austin Hawes Memorial Campground
The marker is located on the left past the stop sign.
the Senior Center. From 1834 to 1880 the mill produced wood shingles, lumber, chair parts, clothes pins, and other wood products.
 
Location. 41° 56.087′ N, 73° 0.166′ W. Marker is in Barkhamsted, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker is on West River Road 1 miles north of Route 318, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker is located 100 yards past the Campground entrance sign. Marker is in this post office area: Barkhamsted CT 06063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp White (approx. 0.4 miles away); Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away); Peoples State Forest (approx. 0.6 miles away); Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village (approx. 0.6 miles away); Henry Robinson Buck (approx. 0.7 miles away); Squire's Tavern (approx. 0.8 miles away); Barkhamsted Center Cemetery (approx. 2 miles away); Barkhamsted Soldiers Memorial (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barkhamsted.
 
Also see . . .
1. American Legion State Forest. (Submitted on March 21, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. CCC shelter. (Submitted on March 21, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Farmington Wild and Scenic River. (Submitted on March 21, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkEnvironmentMan-Made Features
 
Camp White image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 29, 2016
3. Camp White
Several stone foundations remain from this CCC camp.
This CCC stone and wood footbridge connected 2 Connecticut State Parks. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 29, 2016
4. This CCC stone and wood footbridge connected 2 Connecticut State Parks.
The foundation is located 0.5 miles north of the Campground entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 21, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 21, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement