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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station

 
 
Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 25, 2017
1. Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker
Inscription. On the site of the present Market Street Post Office Building stood until the early 1960’s the old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station, Harrisburg’s second passenger terminal that exemplified the City’s prominence and traditional role as transportation center in the Northeastern United States. Although the Pennsylvania Railroad had emerged by the mid 19th Century as the industry which would later dominated rail travel, the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company would throughout the second half of the 19th Century be a stiff competitor to the “Pennsy” both in freight and passenger service. Founded in 1850 for the shipping of coal from the Commonwealth’s Anthracite regions, the P&R expanded to include passengers to serve the Lebanon and Leigh Valleys en route to New York City. The Railroad’s first depot was built in 1857-58 on the north side of Market Street about where the subway under the existing railroad tracks exists today. This station saw much activity during the Civil War as a point of debarkation for troops mustered at Camp Curtin. The building was replaced in 1904 by a grand neo-classically styled edifice on the south side of Market Street. The building exemplified the majestic high-ceiling stations of the early 20th Century. Both the Philadelphia & Reading and the Pennsylvania Station around the corner at Fourth
Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 25, 2017
2. Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker
The marker location (right) with the station site across the street. A freight train is running on the viaduct in the background (qv).
and Chestnut Streets were the center of a tremendous amount of rail travel through Harrisburg (illegible) the 1920s. The reading Railroad as it became known after it separated from the P&R through antitrust litigation, declined after World War II in both passenger (mostly illegible to end).
 
Erected by The Harrisburg History Project Commissioned by Mayor Stephen R. Reed.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Pennsylvania, The Harrisburg History Project marker series.
 
Location. 40° 15.834′ N, 76° 52.607′ W. Marker is in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is on Market Street near N 9th St, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Harrisburg PA 17101, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harris Switch Tower (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pennsylvania Canal (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Pennsylvania Railroad Station (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Pennsylvania Canal (approx. 0.2 miles away); U.S. Colored Troops Grand Review (approx. 0.2 miles away); Maurice K. Goddard
Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 25, 2017
3. Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker
Insert; the viaduct from the previous photo is visible.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Presidential Convention (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mulberry Street Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harrisburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker has aged badly.
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 27, 2013
4. Old Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Station Marker
Insert
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 26, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 80 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 26, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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