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Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Monument to Scottish Immigrants

 
 
Monument to Scottish Immigrants Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 22, 2017
1. Monument to Scottish Immigrants Marker
Inscription.

This Monument to Scottish Immigrants seeks to provide a broad perspective on the rise and the movement of the Scots over many continents and centuries. On either side of this Monument you will find Standing Stones which will assist you in understanding this ancient and ongoing process.

The Standing Stones are part of the landscape and history of all the Celtic lands. Many remain in Scotland today. While the original purpose of these stones is not known, it is believed they served a spiritual purpose, and may have had scientific astronomical significance as well. We have adopted them in this Monument as symbolic of Scotland's ancient past.

The Scots are sometimes reckoned to be 'Celtic' because the languages spoken in Britain at the time of Christ were closely related to that of the Celtae, a people of central France (then called Gaul). Other related languages were spoken in Ireland, in parts of Spain and Italy, and even in modern Turkey, where the name of the Celtic-speaking 'Galatians' (to whom St Paul wrote) can be compared to Galicia in Spain, to Gaul and to the Irish 'Gaels'. Those who spoke these languages sometimes shared other cultural traits, for example in their arts and crafts, probably due to idea-sharing among political and trading partners rather than invasions and migrations.

In Scotland the Gaelic language

Monument to Scottish Immigrants Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 22, 2017
2. Monument to Scottish Immigrants Marker
Marker is on a Standing Stone pillar to the right (south) of the sculpture, not visible in the photo
became dominant by AD 1000, but previously it co-existed with dialects of the Celtic language known today as Welsh. By then, the English language advancing northwards from as early as AD 400, was spoken across much of southern Scotland. This 'Scots' English language grew increasingly dominant, especially in modern times, but many aspects of Scottish culture date from the days when Gaelic was more commonly spoken, and some of these have historically played an important role in shaping modern Scottish identities.

This plaque is dedicated, with appreciation, to
Glenfarclas Distilleries Ltd
in recognition of their generous support of this
Monument to Scottish Immigrants

 
Erected 2011 by Concerned Citizens and Organizations.
 
Location. 39° 56.84′ N, 75° 8.531′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on Front Street south of Ionic Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: I-95 Park (125-171 South Front Street), Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Courage of the Scottish Immigrants (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Monument to Scottish Immigrants (here, next to this marker); St. Andrew's Society of Philadelphia (a few steps from this marker); History of Scotland (a few steps from this marker); Tun Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania Abolition Society (within shouting distance of this marker); The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael (within shouting distance of this marker); An Gorta Mór - Ireland's Great Hunger (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Scottish History. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. National Scottish Immigrants' Memorial Unveiled. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. National Monument to Scottish Immigrants. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Philadelphia: Immigrant City. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Scots to Colonial North Carolina. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
6. Emigration and passenger lists (National Library of Scotland). (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
7. A brief history of emigration & immigration in Scotland. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
8. Scottish Emigration to America. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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