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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Passage and Emigration

 
 
Passage and Emigration Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 22, 2017
1. Passage and Emigration Marker
Inscription.

In hopeless circumstances at home, the Irish fled their homeland by the hundreds of thousands each year. From 1845-1855, nearly a quarter of the population emigrated, mostly from rural, Catholic, often Irish-speaking areas of Ireland. They fled to England, to Australia, and in greatest numbers to North America, seeking new homes in Canada and the United States. Thus began a pattern of emigration that would become a psychic trauma in Irish life for over a hundred years.
• At the height of the Hunger Migration, the five- to eight-week journey was especially perilous. The most desperate took unprecedented winter crossings to Canada on what came to be called "coffin ships" where fever and typhus became unwelcome shipmates. Many of those ships were cargo vessels used to bring lumber from Canadian forests to build English cities. Now Irish immigrants served as human ballast in the holds of these ships for the return trip. Thousands perished on the journey or in quarantine stations on arrival in the land they had hoped would save them. Historian Cecil Woodham-Smith writes, "The thousands who poured over the Atlantic in 1847 were fugitives, a helpless horde of the kind which flees from a bombed town." Despite the trauma of the journey, they continued to come and would do so for generations following The Great Hunger.

[Illustration

The Irish Memorial and Markers 5 through 8 image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 22, 2017
2. The Irish Memorial and Markers 5 through 8
Looking WSW from near Chestnut Street and Christopher Columbus Blvd
caption reads]
Right: Excerpts from a letter dated 1847, written in Ireland by Hannah Curtis Lynch, to her brother John Curtis, in Philadelphia. It describes the destitute conditions in their townland. Hannah pleaded with John to send money to allow her and other remaining family members to buy passage. Hannah's pleas did not go unheard. She and her husband migrated in 1848.
(excerpts from the letter are courtesy of The Balch Collections, The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, The Curtis Family Papers, MSS072.)
 
Erected 2003 by Concerned Citizens and Organizations. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Location. 39° 56.872′ N, 75° 8.51′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street and Front Street, on the right when traveling east on Market Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: I-95 Park (100 South Front Street), Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Irish in America (here, next to this marker); Arrival and Reception (here, next to this marker); The Lessons of The Great Hunger (here, next to this marker); The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael
The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
3. The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael
(a few steps from this marker); Starvation (within shouting distance of this marker); An Gorta Mór - Ireland's Great Hunger (within shouting distance of this marker); The Potato Blight - Its Origin (within shouting distance of this marker); Ireland's Past - A Prelude to Disaster (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. Marker is part of The Irish Memorial.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Irish Memorial [Philadelphia]. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. The Irish Potato Famine, 1847. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Great Irish Famine Commemoration. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Irish Famine Archive. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Passage to the Americas. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
6. Effects of the Famine: Emigration. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
Famine Detail on The Irish Memorial Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
4. Famine Detail on The Irish Memorial Sculpture

7. Coffin ships: death and pestilence on the Atlantic. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
8. Cohb Heritage Centre, Ireland. (Submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. DisastersPoliticsWaterways & Vessels
 
Starvation or Emigration Detail on The Irish Memorial Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
5. Starvation or Emigration Detail on The Irish Memorial Sculpture
Arrival in a New World Detail on the Irish Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
6. Arrival in a New World Detail on the Irish Memorial
The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
7. The Irish Memorial / Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 89 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 29, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 28, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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