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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Washington's Death and a Renewed Hope for Freedom

 
 
Washington's Death and a Renewed Hope for Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 23, 2017
1. Washington's Death and a Renewed Hope for Freedom Marker
Inscription.

When President John Adams ordered a day of mourning throughout the nation to mark George Washington's death in 1799, Reverend Richard Allen saw an opportunity for the Free African Community of Philadelphia to expand the meaning of liberty. He called on Americans to honor the first president by imitating his will in which he freed his slaves, and by heeding the Free Africans' increasingly bold petitions to Congress.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 39° 57.026′ N, 75° 9.001′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street and South Independence Mall East (5th Street), on the right when traveling east on Market Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: President's House Site N of Liberty Bell Pavilion, Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "I will fear no Evil" (here, next to this marker); The House & the People Who Worked & Lived In It (here, next to this marker); History Lost & Found (here, next to this marker); "An Act respecting fugitives from Justice" (here, next

Washington's Last Illness image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 19, 2017
2. Washington's Last Illness
This 1800 hand water colored etching of “Washington in his last illness attended by Doc.rs Craik and Brown” by an unknown artist hangs in the Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“American engravers enjoyed a steady market in the late eighteenth century with the booming demand for illustrations and popular prints. Following the Revolutionary War, George Washington’s status as a national icon spurred the fledgling industry into supplying inexpensive portraits to meet public demand. Washington’s death on December 14, 1799, would prompt an outpouring of oratorical and pictorial tributes. This deathbed scene, which alludes to published accounts of the president’s final moments, shows a physician taking Washington’s pulse with the aid of a stopwatch. Americans purchased souvenir handkerchiefs that featured this image on one side and a complementary mourning picture on the other.” – National Portrait Gallery
to this marker); Suppressing the Opposition (here, next to this marker); The Keeper of the House (here, next to this marker); "We shall come to a civil war" (here, next to this marker); "I am free now" (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. Marker is associated with a National Park Service audio-visual presentation on the subject.
 
Also see . . .
1. Washington’s Will: A Decision to Free His Slaves. (Submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Reverend Richard Allen Autobiography. (Submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Richard Allen Bio. (Submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Notable Events
 
Washington's Death and a Renewed Hope for Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., March 23, 2017
3. Washington's Death and a Renewed Hope for Freedom Marker
Looking east from the President's House partial reconstruction
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 103 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on November 2, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on March 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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