Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Northeast Harbor in Hancock County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Carriage Roads - Building the Roads

 
 
Carriage Roads - Building the Roads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
1. Carriage Roads - Building the Roads Marker
Inscription.
September 25, 1918
“Dismissal of Incompetent Persons
Any incompetent person or persons who may be employed on the work shall be removed on the requisition of the owner or engineer; and no person so removed shall thereafter be employed upon any portion of the work.

Spiritous Liquors
Contractors are not to give or sell or suffer anyone to give or sell or keep any ardent spirits on any part of the work or in any boarding house or building under his control”
From carriage road construction contract


The carriage roads, built from 1913 to 1940, were state of the art for their time. Steam-powered machines made some construction easier, but intensive hand labor was still required. Laborers dug ditches, masons built retaining walls, and stonecutters shaped granite bridge facing. Blacksmiths worked on-site to sharpen simple tools such as hand drills.

These roads have survived many years, despite weathering and limited maintenance – a testimony to the craftsmanship and methods used.
 
Location. 44° 18.733′ N, 68° 17.115′ W. Marker is near Northeast Harbor, Maine, in Hancock County. Marker can be reached from Maine Route 3 half a mile north of
Marker inset: Workers construct Hemlock Bridge, circa 1924 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
2. Marker inset: Workers construct Hemlock Bridge, circa 1924
Photo courtesy of the Rockefeller Archive Center
Route 198. Touch for map. Marker is located near the Brown Mountain carriage road trailhead. Marker is in this post office area: Northeast Harbor ME 04662, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Seawater Bay (approx. 1.1 miles away); Somes Sound (approx. 1.1 miles away); Joseph T. Musetti Jr. Veterans Memorial Park (approx. 1.3 miles away); Carriage Roads - The Gate Lodges (approx. 1.7 miles away); Gateway to Acadia (approx. 1.7 miles away); Drink in the View (approx. 1.9 miles away); Granite Foundations (approx. 1.9 miles away); Glacial Freight (approx. 2˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Northeast Harbor.
 
Also see . . .
1. Acadia's Historic Carriage Roads.
Forty-five miles of rustic carriage roads, the gift of philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. and family, weave around the mountains and valleys of Acadia National Park. Rockefeller, a skilled horseman, wanted to travel on motor-free byways via horse and carriage into the heart of Mount Desert Island. His construction efforts from 1913 to 1940 resulted in roads with sweeping vistas and close-up views of the landscape. His love of road building ensured a state-of-the-art system. (Submitted on April 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Carriage Road (<b><i>near the marker</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
3. Carriage Road (near the marker)
 

2. Carriage Roads & Bridges.
John D. Rockefeller, Sr., had previously built carriage roads on his private estates in Ohio and New York. John, Jr., acquired a love for this same type of road building practice which enabled him to envision the construction of similar roads on Mount Desert Island. His family’s great wealth allowed him to do something about it. Throughout, John Jr. showed an excellent sense of landscape design by making sure that the roads flowed with the natural setting rather than re-shaping the land to accommodate. Even Maine’s wet coastal climate was taken into account when choosing to use stone culverts, wide ditches, three layers of crushed rock, and a 6 - 8 inch crown that provided excellent water drainage. This showed a clear respect for the landscape and an understanding of the requirements. His experience and love of traveling by horse drawn carriages aided in making additional design choices that met those particular needs. (Submitted on April 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Carriage Roads In Acadia.
Though sometimes called carriage trails, the word trail is truly a misnomer. The roads are 16 feet wide with generous crowns that keep them well drained. Considered the best example of broken stone roads in the United States, they are, indeed, an engineering wonder. Local workers quarried granite right here on the island to
Brown Mountain Gate (<b><i>near the marker</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
4. Brown Mountain Gate (near the marker)
build the intricate network of roads and 17 spectacular stone bridges. In fact, the stone cutters developed such skill that Rockefeller asked them to create a more rustic look. He also took care to preserve trees and to landscape with native plants—ferns, sheep laurel, and blueberry bushes—so the roads blend naturally with their surroundings. (Submitted on April 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesRoads & Vehicles
 
Brown Mountain Gatehouse - Trails and Carriage Roads image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
5. Brown Mountain Gatehouse - Trails and Carriage Roads

Map and legend near the Carriage Roads marker
Trails and Carriage Roads Map Detail image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2008
6. Trails and Carriage Roads Map Detail
Day Mountain Carriage Road image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2008
7. Day Mountain Carriage Road
Day Mountain Carriage Road Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2008
8. Day Mountain Carriage Road Bridge
Duck Brook Carriage Road Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 15, 2008
9. Duck Brook Carriage Road Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 79 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   7, 8, 9. submitted on May 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement