Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Life on the Rivers of Georgetown

 
 
Life on the Rivers of Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 31, 2017
1. Life on the Rivers of Georgetown Marker
Inscription.
Georgetown is blessed with deep navigable rivers that historically served as the city's safest and easiest routes for trading. Four rivers flow together to form Winyah Bay: Sampit, Waccamaw, Pee Dee, and Black. Each river's name, with the exception of the Black River, derives from local Native American vernacular. In the 1930's, the Intra-Coastal Waterway was constructed by making use of the Waccamaw River and Winyah Bay. Georgetown's rivers not only served for transportation use, they are also home for the indigenous marine life and shore birds. Today these rivers are utilized by locals for recreational purposes such as fishing, hunting, and boating.
 
Erected by Seaport of Georgetown.
 
Location. 33° 21.967′ N, 79° 17.033′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker can be reached from Harborwalk, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Georgetown SC 29440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Georgetown County Veteran’s Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Major C. Spencer Guerry (within shouting distance of this marker); Francis Marion (within shouting
Life on the Rivers of Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 31, 2017
2. Life on the Rivers of Georgetown Marker
distance of this marker); 732 - 734 Front Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 726 Front Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 724 Front Street (about 300 feet away); 718 Front Street (about 300 feet away); The Rice Museum (about 500 feet away); South Carolina’s Third Oldest City (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named South Carolina's Third Oldest City (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sampit River. The Sampit River begins in a swampy area of western Georgetown County, South Carolina, USA. It flows in an easterly direction to Winyah Bay at Georgetown. Only small crafts can navigate the upper parts of the river. The lower river merges into the bay and is deepened by tidal flows, and (to Georgetown harbor) by dredging. (Submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Waccamaw River. The Waccamaw River is a river, approximately 140 miles (225 km) long, in southeastern North Carolina and eastern South Carolina in the United States. It drains an area of approximately 1110 square miles in the coastal plain along the eastern border between the two states into the Atlantic Ocean. Along its upper course, it is a slow-moving, blackwater river surrounded by vast wetlands, passable only by shallow-draft watercraft such as canoe. Along its lower course, it is lined by sandy banks and old plantation houses, providing an important navigation channel with a unique geography, flowing roughly parallel to the coast. (Submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Pee Dee River. The Pee Dee River, also known as the Great Pee Dee River, is a river in the U.S. states of North Carolina and South Carolina. It originates in the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina, where its upper course, above the mouth of the Uwharrie River is known as the Yadkin River. It is extensively dammed for flood control and hydroelectric power. The lower part of the river is named Pee Dee (in colonial times written Pedee) after the Native American Pee Dee tribe. (Submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Black River. The Black River is a 151-mile-long (243 km) blackwater river in South Carolina in the United States. (Submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Winyah Bay. Winyah Bay is a coastal estuary that is the confluence of the Waccamaw River, the Pee Dee River, the Black River, and the Sampit River in Georgetown County, in eastern South Carolina. The historic port city of Georgetown is located on the bay, and the bay generally serves as the terminating point for the Grand Strand. (Submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 80 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 8, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
Paid Advertisement