Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Little Joe II

 
 
Little Joe II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
1. Little Joe II Marker
Inscription.
The first major flight tests in the Apollo program were performed by the Little Joe II launch vehicle. These unmanned flights tested the command module launch escape system and qualified it for operational use in the Apollo program. The test series involved five Little Joe II launches at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.
Launch Dates
August 28, 1963 May 13, 1964 December 8, 1964 May 19, 1965 January 20, 1966

During its time, the Little Joe II was the most powerful solid rocket launch vehicle in the U.S. inventory, with a maximum total thrust of 816,200 pounds provided by seven Aerojet Algol 1D motors. The trajectory of the vehicle was controlled by varying the launch angle. It was guided by a combination of aerodynamic fins and reaction jets. Atop this Little Joe II is the boilerplate 22 command module, flown on the fourth flight. Little Joe II was designed and manufactured for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by the General Dynamics Convair Division, San Diego, California.

( placard on the rocket stand )
The Little Joe The Little Joe II launch vehicle was used for Apollo spacecraft transonic and abort testing at White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico during 1964-1966, and represented an important milestone in the lunar landing program. It
Little Joe II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
2. Little Joe II Marker
( placard on the rocket stand )
was powered by a variety of solid-propellant rocket motors.
In May 1965, this Command Module(CM) boilerplate (BP22) and Launch Escape System(LES) were launched atop a Little Joe ll like this one for a high-altitude abort test at White Sands. Twenty-five seconds after liftoff the Little Joe unexpectedly began to break up and destroyed itself at 14,000 feet. The LES sensed the malfunction and fired, boosting this Command Module to 19,000 feet and away from danger, and the parachute system lowered the boilerplate to the desert below. Though unplanned, this emergency demonstrated successfully what the LES was designed to do.
During the actual launch of the three-man Apollo CM the LES was designed to propel the spacecraft and its crew to safety in the event of a Saturn launch vehicle failure on the pad or during powered flight.
 
Location. 29° 33.282′ N, 95° 5.618′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker can be reached from E. NASA Pkwy half a mile north of Point Lookout Drive, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located next to the Saturn Rocket Building in Johnson Space Flight Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston TX 77058, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mercury-Redstone
Little Joe II Launch Vehicle image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
3. Little Joe II Launch Vehicle
(a few steps from this marker); Apollo Mission Control Center (approx. 0.4 miles away); West Mansion (was approx. 1.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Seito and Kiyoaki Saibara (approx. 1.7 miles away); Harris County Boys' School Archeological Site (approx. 1.7 miles away); Webster Presbyterian Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); Fairview Cemetery (approx. 2 miles away); Site of Galveston County Poor Farm (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .
1. NASA Johnson Space Flight Center. (Submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Little Joe II on Wikipedia. (Submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Air & Space
 
Little Joe II Launch Vehicle image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 31, 2017
4. Little Joe II Launch Vehicle
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 100 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 12, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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