Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tupelo in Lee County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Sit-Ins Led to Civil Rights Act of 1964 / F.W. Woolworth

 
 
Sit-Ins Led to Civil Rights Act of 1964 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
1. Sit-Ins Led to Civil Rights Act of 1964 Marker
Inscription.
Sit-Ins Led to Civil Rights Act of 1964

During the 1960s, F. W. Woolworth Company operated lunch counters at its "five-and-dime stores" on a "local custom" basis - meaning racially segregated seating in the Southern United States. As the movement to resist segregation grew, the Tupelo Woolworth store lunch Counter was the scene of local protests. While other sit-ins were contentious, the Tupelo events were peaceful. In 1964, the passage of the Civil Rights Act prompted Woolworth to announce "now the company will be able to serve all its customers in all of its stores on a desegregated basis." The Civil Rights Act was momentous for African-Americans; however as in most of the South, it would be several years before full integration was commonplace in Tupelo.

F.W. Woolworth

Sit-ins were an integral part of the non-violent strategy of civil disobedience and mass protests that eventually led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. On February 1, 1960, four African-American college students from the Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina asked to be served at the lunch counter of the Greensboro, North Carolina, Woolworth store. This first Woolworth sit-in had very little effect on the store that day, but when a larger group returned
F.W. Woolworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
2. F.W. Woolworth Marker
the next day, wire services picked up the story, and word began to spread to other college campuses. The protests continued at the Woolworth store and spread to other food counters in Greensboro, with 54 sit-ins in 15 cities and nine states in the South reported over the next seven days. The national attention aided the students goal to accelerate the pace of the civil rights movement and showed that non-violent direct action and participation by youth could be very useful weapons in the war against segregation.
 
Erected 2013 by the Tupelo Convention and Visitors Bureau.
 
Location. 34° 15.402′ N, 88° 42.257′ W. Marker is in Tupelo, Mississippi, in Lee County. Marker is at the intersection of South Spring Street and Troy Street, on the right when traveling north on South Spring Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 111 South Spring Street, Tupelo MS 38804, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Iron Furnace / Front Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tupelo Hardware (about 400 feet away); Tupelo Confederate Soldiers Monument (about 700 feet away); The Younger Cabin / Confederate Headquarters
The former F.W. Woolworth store, now part of Reed's Gumtree Bookstore. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
3. The former F.W. Woolworth store, now part of Reed's Gumtree Bookstore.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Elvis Presley and Tupelo (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Commemoration of Hernando De Soto (approx. mile away); Shake Rag Community (approx. mile away); Tupelo Baptist Church / Kind Treatment for the Wounded (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tupelo.
 
More about this marker. The initial marker for the Civil Rights & African American Heritage trail, part of the Heritage Trails Enrichment Program.
 
Also see . . .  Tupelo unveils civil rights marker. (Submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducation
 
Marker is on extreme left corner. Beautiful "bookshelf" wall coverings on Troy Street side. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
4. Marker is on extreme left corner. Beautiful "bookshelf" wall coverings on Troy Street side.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement