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Tupelo in Lee County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of King's Creek / The Campaign to Take Vicksburg

 
 
The Battle of King's Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
1. The Battle of King's Creek Marker
Inscription.
The Battle of King's Creek

The campaign to take Vicksburg and control of the Mississippi River had begun. On May 5, 1863, mounted infantry and cavalry units of the Federal Ninth Illinois, Tenth Missouri and Seventh Kansas, under the command of Colonel Florence Cornyn, were regrouping here when they came under attack by Confederate (CSA) forces under the command of Major W. M. Inge. The attack was driven back by dismounted cavalry armed with Colt revolving rifles. The Federals relocated to a stronger position one-half mile southwest where they were engaged by Confederate forces under the command of CSA Colonel Barteau. Heavy fighting occurred north and south of King's Creek. The Confederates were routed after coming under canister fire from three mountain howitzers located atop a ridge south of the creek. Union forces suffered 23 casualties while the Confederates lost 20, with 40 wounded and 81 taken prisoner along with a large number of horses and equipment.

The Campaign to Take Vicksburg

"Vicksburg is the key!" U.S. President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed, adding, "The war can never be brought to a close until that key is in our pocket!" In the spring of 1862, the Federal campaign to take Vicksburg, Mississippi, began. General Ulysses
The Campaign to Take Vicksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
2. The Campaign to Take Vicksburg Marker
S. Grant's plan included sending Federal forces down the east and west sides of Mississippi to occupy Confederate troops and destroy railroads and supply lines that might save a besieged Vicksburg, vital to keeping the Mississippi River out of Union control. General Grant's plan worked, as area troops were not able to reach the beleaguered Confederate troops in Vicksburg, and the city surrendered to Union dictate on July 4, 1863, giving control of the Mississippi River to Federal troops.
 
Erected 2013 by the Tupelo Convention and Visitors Bureau.
 
Location. 34° 15.121′ N, 88° 42.249′ W. Marker is in Tupelo, Mississippi, in Lee County. Marker is on South Spring Street south of Elliott Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: South Spring Street, Tupelo MS 38804, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sit-Ins Led to Civil Rights Act of 1964 / F.W. Woolworth (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Iron Furnace / Front Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tupelo Hardware (approx. 0.4 miles away); Elvis Presley and Tupelo (approx. 0.4 miles away); In Commemoration of Hernando De Soto
The view north on Spring Street towards downtown Tupelo. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
3. The view north on Spring Street towards downtown Tupelo.
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Tupelo Confederate Soldiers Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Shake Rag Community (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Younger Cabin / Confederate Headquarters (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tupelo.
 
More about this marker. Part of the Tupelo Civil War Trail in the Heritage Trails Enrichment Program.
 
Also see . . .  Tupelo marks Civil War history. (Submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Area of the King's Creek campaign. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 7, 2017
4. Area of the King's Creek campaign.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 91 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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