Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Standing at the Crossroads 1861

 
 
Standing at the Crossroads 1861 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. Standing at the Crossroads 1861 Marker
Inscription. Pre-war Middle Tennessee thrived. Residents free and enslaved grew copious amounts of corn, wheat, timber, cattle, and horses, and no area of the South produced more mules and hog. Toads, rails, and telegraph wires webbed across the center of the state, connecting it firmly to an industrializing nation. Nashville hosted five major railroad lines, making it a vital hub in the heart of the United States, and its Cumberland River served as a major artery to all points west.

Some residents here owned another type of wealth. Though most southern white families did not own slaves, the institution seeded deeply in fertile croplands such as these. In Williamson County, 52 percent of the population was enslaved. Yet this area was not eager for secession. In February 1861, a state-wide referendum called for a convention on whether to leave the Union. Middle Tennesseans narrowly voted against the proposal. But with the fall of Fort Sumter in April, the corridor turned heavily toward secession, and Tennessee officially left the Union on June 8, 1861.

The Volunteer State soon became a prime target, as both the Confederacy and the Union saw these rails, roads, foods, people, and horsepower as critical to their success. As 1861 drew to a close, the state had not yet seen direct combat, but that would soon change. By the end of
Standing at the Crossroads 1861 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. Standing at the Crossroads 1861 Marker
the war, Tennessee would suffer more military engagements than any other state except Virginia.
 
Erected by Franklin's Charge.
 
Location. 35° 54.298′ N, 86° 51.519′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Becoming the Front Line 1862 (here, next to this marker); A Crucial War Zone 1863 (here, next to this marker); The Final Campaign 1864 (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Franklin (here, next to this marker); Hood's Retreat (here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .  Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 11, 2017.)
 
Categories. African AmericansAgricultureRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
William "Dock" Owen image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
3. William "Dock" Owen
William "Dock" Owen was one of more than 12,000 enslaved people in Williamson County at the start of the Civil War
The McMahon Brothers image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
4. The McMahon Brothers
Lemuel and Andrew McMahon of Williamson County joined the war early and survived to see the end.
The Confederacy in 1861 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
5. The Confederacy in 1861
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 10, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 78 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 10, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement