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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of Franklin

 
 
The Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. The Battle of Franklin Marker
Inscription. Soon after passing this point, the Southern assault came within range of Federal artillery. Just west of here, an advanced line of 3,000 Union troops began to fall back, and the Confederates pursued them into the main Union line. In moments, the battle became a mass of confusion. On the western and eastern flanks, Confederate soldiers fell in ghastly numbers, torn apart by rapid rifle and cannon fire. Yet in the center, as the Union advanced line fell back, their comrades briefly held their fire, allowing the charging Confederates to break through.

A massive hole opened along the Federal center, and for nearly thirty minutes combat along both sides of Columbia Pike and around the Carter House turned exceptionally violent. Only through the efforts of a number of Federal recruits and several veteran regiments was the Confederate assault halted. From that point onward, the battle degenerated into hand-to-hand fighting that shocked even the most hardened soldiers.

After three fierce hours, the battle slowly died away. By 9pm it was over, and nearly 10,000 men were dead, wounded, missing, or captured. Of these, nearly 7,500 were Confederates making Franklin one of their most lopsided defeats of the war.

(sidebar)
For their actions at the Battle of Franklin, eleven Union soldiers would later be awarded
The Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. The Battle of Franklin Marker
the Medal of Honor. Among them was Major Arthur MacArthur, father of Douglas MacArthur who would go on to great game in World War II and Korea.

At 4 pm on November 30, 1864, the last major Confederate assault of the Civil War unfolded here. Nearly 20,000 Confederate troops advanced across these fields and toward an equally large Union army positioned around the southern edge of Franklin, just as a late autumn sun began to set.
 
Erected by Franklin's Charge.
 
Location. 35° 54.297′ N, 86° 51.519′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Final Campaign 1864 (here, next to this marker); Hood's Retreat (here, next to this marker); Standing at the Crossroads 1861 (here, next to this marker); Becoming the Front Line 1862 (here, next to this marker); A Crucial War Zone 1863
The Battle of Franklin image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
3. The Battle of Franklin
(here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Franklin. (Submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
2. Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Battle of Franklin image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
4. The Battle of Franklin
Major Arthur MacArthur image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
5. Major Arthur MacArthur
The Carter House image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
6. The Carter House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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