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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank

Recruiting For War

 
 
Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank Marker
Inscription. On September 28, 1861, local men sympathetic to the Confederacy gathered in this field to form the Williamson County Cavalry (Co. F, 4th Tennessee Cavalry). The local newspaper pronounced the company composed of “about 100 of the finest looking men we ever saw.”

This scene was repeated across the country, North and South, as the war’s initial excitement generated a rush of volunteers. Numbers soon reached into the hundreds of thousands, eventually producing the two largest armies in the world at the time. By war’s end, nearly one million had served in the Confederate armed forces and two million for the Union. Most were volunteers.

Almost all recruiting occurred at the state and local levels. The vast majority of white men of military age in Williamson County enlisted, filling all or part of twelve Confederate infantry companies, six cavalry companies, and one artillery company. Of those companies, twelve fought in the Battle of Franklin, including the Williamson County Cavalry.

The county also produced Union volunteers, including many who enlisted in Co. H, 5th Tennessee Cavalry (US). Overall, Tennessee lived up to its nickname- the Volunteer State – by enlisting 120,000 men for the Confederacy and more than 31,000 for the Union. Approximately one out of seven Confederate soldiers came
Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank Marker
from Tennessee, which also produced more Union soldiers than all of the Deep South states combined.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 54.317′ N, 86° 51.558′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewsiburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin
Recruiting Announcement image. Click for full size.
By Hank Brockman
3. Recruiting Announcement
This announcement appeared in Franklin during the first summer of the war, calling for militiamen to meet and train these fields. In both North and South, the militia was often used to keep local order and train new recruits
(within shouting distance of this marker); Standing at the Crossroads 1861 (within shouting distance of this marker); Becoming the Front Line 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); A Crucial War Zone 1863 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .  Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
James W. Starnes image. Click for full size.
Williamson County Archives
4. James W. Starnes
James W. Starnes was a surgeon, a planter, and the largest slaveholder in this county, owning more than 110 people. When the Williamson County Cavalry was formed here in 1861, the recruits elected him captain. The unit eventually served under Confederate Gen. Nathaniel Bedford Forrest. It returned here on November 20, 1864, to fight in the Battle of Franklin, but without Starnes who had died in combat near Tullshoma, Tennessee, in 1863
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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