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Monterey in Franklin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Monterey Pass

The Wolverines Fight

 
 
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 11, 2015
1. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
Inscription.  Union General George A. Custer’s cavalry brigade advanced here, along the banks of red run, deploying along both sides of the road. The 5th Michigan Cavalry deployed to the right, while the 7th, 6th and portions of the 1st Michigan Cavalry deployed to the left.

As fighting raged in the middle of the night, the battlefield became disorganized due to the weather conditions. Hand-to-hand combat took place and was extremely fierce at times. To make matters worse, a herd of cattle had broken away from the Confederate wagon train along the Maria Furnace Road, forcing Custer’s battle line to stall. General Kilpatrick, headquartered at the Monterey Inn, ordered artillery to support Custer near the present-day golf course. Captain Alexander Pennington deployed two rifled cannon and began to shell the Confederate battle line. Kilpatrick also ordered the 1st West Virginia Cavalry, and a portion of the 1st Ohio Cavalry to support the Wolverines.

Once Colonel Russell Alger realized that the wooden bridge than spanned red Run was intact, he sent two companies of the 5th Michigan Cavalry over the bridge, where they filed off to the left. This
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 11, 2015
2. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
The marker's former location in Rolando Woods Park.
allowed the 1st West Virginia Cavalry to charge and break through the confederate battle line.

“It was too dark to distinguish objects at any distance. The darkness was intense and in a few moments we plunged into a dense thicket… One had to be guided by sound and not by sight… had it not been for the noise and the flashing of the enemy’s fire we should have wondered (sic) away in the darkness and been lost.”
Captain James Kidd, 6th Michigan Cavalry
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 44.308′ N, 77° 28.711′ W. Marker was in Monterey, Pennsylvania, in Franklin County. Marker was on Charmian Road 0.1 miles from Buchanan Trail East (Pennsylvania Route 16), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Waynesboro PA 17268, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. 10,000 Soldiers Fight at Monterey Pass (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (here, next to this marker); The Retreat From Gettysburg (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown's Spring (within shouting distance
Artillerist image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 11, 2015
3. Artillerist
of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (about 300 feet away); Battle of Monterey Pass/Michigan Cavalry Brigade (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Monterey.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Brigade commander image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 11, 2015
4. Brigade commander
The battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 11, 2015
5. The battlefield
 
More. Search the internet for The Battle of Monterey Pass.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 174 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 17, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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