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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Dream Postponed

The Struggle of Freed People in Williamson County

 
 
A Dream Postponed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. A Dream Postponed Marker
Inscription. To assist the newly freed with court cases, education, and housing, Congress formed the Freedmenís Bureau in 1865. An additional goal of the Bureau was to help create labor contracts between white landowners and the formerly enslaved. In October 1865, contract negotiations began for residents in Williamson County. The results were disappointing.

Workers were usually paid in food and shelter. Some received small monthly or yearly cash payments. Laborers who left the area before the contract was over or were sick during planting or harvest time were often given harsh penalties, including the loss of any pay. In addition, the cost of medical care and blacksmith fees were mainly placed upon the laborer.

The workday was sunrise to sunset. Most contracts allowed half of Saturdays off and all Sunday except for the feeding of livestock or spring planting and fall harvest when the work was essential continuous. Many contracts restricted an African Americanís right to travel or receive visitors.
 
Erected by Franklin's Charge.
 
Location. 35° 54.345′ N, 86° 51.615′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewsiburg Pike
A Dream Postponed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. A Dream Postponed Marker
(Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Reunions at McGavock's Grove (here, next to this marker); The Long Road to Recovery (here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Franklin, Aftermath (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
2. Franklin's Charge. Preserving the Franklin Battlefield (Submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansAgricultureWar, US Civil
 
1890 Census of African Americans image. Click for full size.
3. 1890 Census of African Americans
1990 Census of African Americans image. Click for full size.
4. 1990 Census of African Americans
Labor Contract Between Billie Miller & Carrie McGavock image. Click for full size.
5. Labor Contract Between Billie Miller & Carrie McGavock
Signing with an X, the illiterate Miller received $50. In return his teenage daughter Mary would be McGavockís servant for a year, with the promise that McGavock would clothe her and treat her humanely.
The Move Toward Communities image. Click for full size.
6. The Move Toward Communities
Along with many other regions, Williamson County experienced the burning of Freedmen Bureau schools, the terrorizing of black families, and the intimidation of immigrants and Republicans, mostly through a group known as the Ku Klux Klan. As a result, many freedmen left their rented farms and harsh contracts, and formed communities for support and safety.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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